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Are integrative or distributive outcomes more satisfactory? The effects of interest-based versus value-based issues on negotiator satisfaction Negotiator satisfaction


Stöckli, Peter Lucas; Tanner, Carmen (2014). Are integrative or distributive outcomes more satisfactory? The effects of interest-based versus value-based issues on negotiator satisfaction Negotiator satisfaction. European Journal of Social Psychology, 44(3):202-208.

Abstract

Negotiation research usually distinguishes between integrative and distributive outcomes. Integrative outcomes satisfy the negotiation parties' most important interests (by trading off less important for more important issues). In contrast, distributive outcomes require negotiators to give up their most important interests (as they make concessions on both less and more important issues). Integrative outcomes are more beneficial, but do they offer greater satisfaction? In this research, we hypothesized that satisfaction with integrative versus distributive outcomes depends on whether people negotiate interest-based or value-based issues. Three experiments consistently revealed that people in interest-based negotiations were more satisfied with integrative outcomes, whereas those in value-based negotiations tended to be more satisfied with distributive outcomes.

Abstract

Negotiation research usually distinguishes between integrative and distributive outcomes. Integrative outcomes satisfy the negotiation parties' most important interests (by trading off less important for more important issues). In contrast, distributive outcomes require negotiators to give up their most important interests (as they make concessions on both less and more important issues). Integrative outcomes are more beneficial, but do they offer greater satisfaction? In this research, we hypothesized that satisfaction with integrative versus distributive outcomes depends on whether people negotiate interest-based or value-based issues. Three experiments consistently revealed that people in interest-based negotiations were more satisfied with integrative outcomes, whereas those in value-based negotiations tended to be more satisfied with distributive outcomes.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Banking and Finance
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:1 April 2014
Deposited On:20 Feb 2015 09:32
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:58
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0046-2772
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2003
Official URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ejsp.2003/abstract
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:10238

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