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Identifying fallers and non-fallers with the maximal base of support width (BSW): A 1-year prospective study


Swanenburg, Jaap; Mittaz Hager, Anne Gabrielle; Nevzati, Arian; Klipstein, Andreas (2015). Identifying fallers and non-fallers with the maximal base of support width (BSW): A 1-year prospective study. Journal of aging and physical activity, 23(2):200-204.

Abstract

The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether the maximal width of the base of support (BSW) measure is able to predict the risk of multiple falls in community-dwelling women. 38 community-dwelling women (mean age of 72 ±8 years old) participated. Falls were prospectively recorded during the following year. Overall, 29 falls were recorded were of 6 (16%) multiple fallers and 32 (84%) non-fallers. There was a significant difference in the BSW between the fallers and non-fallers (F(1, 37) = 5.134 (p = 0.030)). A logistic regression analysis indicated a significant contribution of the BSW test to the model (odds ratio = 0.637; 95% CI [0.407, 0.993]; p = 0.046 per 1 cm).The cut-off score was determined to be 27.8 cm (67% sensitivity and 84% specificity). These results indicate that women with a smaller BSW at baseline had a significantly higher risk of sustaining a fall.

Abstract

The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether the maximal width of the base of support (BSW) measure is able to predict the risk of multiple falls in community-dwelling women. 38 community-dwelling women (mean age of 72 ±8 years old) participated. Falls were prospectively recorded during the following year. Overall, 29 falls were recorded were of 6 (16%) multiple fallers and 32 (84%) non-fallers. There was a significant difference in the BSW between the fallers and non-fallers (F(1, 37) = 5.134 (p = 0.030)). A logistic regression analysis indicated a significant contribution of the BSW test to the model (odds ratio = 0.637; 95% CI [0.407, 0.993]; p = 0.046 per 1 cm).The cut-off score was determined to be 27.8 cm (67% sensitivity and 84% specificity). These results indicate that women with a smaller BSW at baseline had a significantly higher risk of sustaining a fall.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:18 Feb 2015 15:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:58
Publisher:Human Kinetics
ISSN:1063-8652
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1123/japa.2013-0210
PubMed ID:24700385

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