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Factors affecting the success of resynchronization protocols with or without progesterone supplementation in dairy cows


Forro, A; Tsousis, G; Beindorff, N; Sharifi, A R; Brozos, C; Bollwein, H (2015). Factors affecting the success of resynchronization protocols with or without progesterone supplementation in dairy cows. Journal of Veterinary Science, 16(1):121-126.

Abstract

The main objective of this study was to investigate factors that could influence the success of a resynchronization protocol with and without progesterone supplementation. Cows previously synchronized and not found pregnant were randomly assigned in two resynchronization protocols (Day 0); one with the classical Ovulation synchronization (Ovsynch) protocol without progesterone (P4) supplementation (n=66) and the other with exogenous P4 (PRID® alpha, Progesterone 1.55 g; CEVA Tiergesundheit GmbH) from Days 0 to 7 (n=67). Progesterone was measured on Days 0 and 7 of the resynchronization protocol as well as 4 and 5 days post insemination (p.i.). Progesterone supplementation raised the P4 levels on Day 7 (P<0.05), but had no (P>0.05) overall effect on resynchronization rates (RR) or pregnancy per AI (P/AI). However, cows with Body Condition Score (BCS) >3.5 showed increased P/AI and cows with BCS<2.75 decreased P/AI after P4 supplementation. Primiparous cows had higher P4 values on Day 7 than pluriparous cows (6.02 ± 1.49 ng/ml vs. 4.67 ± 0.54 ng/ml, P=0.04) and tended to have higher RR (90.5% vs. 76.9%, P=0.06). In cows having P4 values above 1.0 ng/ml on Day 0, higher RR were noticed in comparison to cows having lower P4 values (88.6% vs. 50% respectively, P=0.02). This study indicates that the supplementation of progesterone in resynchronization protocols has minimal effects on the outcome of these protocols. Parity had an effect on the levels of circulating progesterone at initiation of the protocol, which in term influenced the resynchronization rates.

Abstract

The main objective of this study was to investigate factors that could influence the success of a resynchronization protocol with and without progesterone supplementation. Cows previously synchronized and not found pregnant were randomly assigned in two resynchronization protocols (Day 0); one with the classical Ovulation synchronization (Ovsynch) protocol without progesterone (P4) supplementation (n=66) and the other with exogenous P4 (PRID® alpha, Progesterone 1.55 g; CEVA Tiergesundheit GmbH) from Days 0 to 7 (n=67). Progesterone was measured on Days 0 and 7 of the resynchronization protocol as well as 4 and 5 days post insemination (p.i.). Progesterone supplementation raised the P4 levels on Day 7 (P<0.05), but had no (P>0.05) overall effect on resynchronization rates (RR) or pregnancy per AI (P/AI). However, cows with Body Condition Score (BCS) >3.5 showed increased P/AI and cows with BCS<2.75 decreased P/AI after P4 supplementation. Primiparous cows had higher P4 values on Day 7 than pluriparous cows (6.02 ± 1.49 ng/ml vs. 4.67 ± 0.54 ng/ml, P=0.04) and tended to have higher RR (90.5% vs. 76.9%, P=0.06). In cows having P4 values above 1.0 ng/ml on Day 0, higher RR were noticed in comparison to cows having lower P4 values (88.6% vs. 50% respectively, P=0.02). This study indicates that the supplementation of progesterone in resynchronization protocols has minimal effects on the outcome of these protocols. Parity had an effect on the levels of circulating progesterone at initiation of the protocol, which in term influenced the resynchronization rates.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:March 2015
Deposited On:12 Feb 2015 10:11
Last Modified:13 Aug 2017 05:32
Publisher:Korean Society of Veterinary Science
ISSN:1229-845X
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4142/jvs.2015.16.1.121
Official URL:http://www.vetsci.org/journal/view.html?uid=913&vmd=Full
PubMed ID:25293490

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