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Effectiveness of systematic treatment selection for psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioural therapy: randomised controlled trial in routine mental healthcare


Watzke, Birgit; Rüddel, Heinz; Jürgensen, Ralph; Koch, Uwe; Kriston, Levente; Grothgar, Barbara; Schulz, Holger (2010). Effectiveness of systematic treatment selection for psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioural therapy: randomised controlled trial in routine mental healthcare. British Journal of Psychiatry, 197(2):96-105.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy (PDT) are both effective treatments for mental disorders, they show clear dissimilarities concerning their therapeutic models and treatment rationales.

AIMS

To determine the effectiveness of systematic treatment selection (STS) to CBT or PDT in a mental healthcare setting compared with a control procedure of random treatment selection (RTS).

METHOD

A randomised controlled trial in a consecutive sample of 291 in-patients with at least one ICD-10 mental disorder was performed. The primary outcome was symptom severity (General Severity Index of the Symptom Checklist-14) at 6-month follow-up. Health-related quality of life was the secondary outcome, determined using the Short Form-8.

RESULTS

Analyses revealed no general effect for systematic treatment selection. However, there was a differential effect: systematic selection resulted in a better longer-term outcome for PDT, but not for CBT; STS-PDT patients showed a significantly larger reduction in symptom severity than RTS-PDT patients. This difference was not observed in CBT.

CONCLUSIONS

Since systematic treatment selection seems to be able to optimise treatment outcome, at least for PDT, pursuing systematic treatment assignment strategies in mental healthcare settings is a worthwhile endeavour.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy (PDT) are both effective treatments for mental disorders, they show clear dissimilarities concerning their therapeutic models and treatment rationales.

AIMS

To determine the effectiveness of systematic treatment selection (STS) to CBT or PDT in a mental healthcare setting compared with a control procedure of random treatment selection (RTS).

METHOD

A randomised controlled trial in a consecutive sample of 291 in-patients with at least one ICD-10 mental disorder was performed. The primary outcome was symptom severity (General Severity Index of the Symptom Checklist-14) at 6-month follow-up. Health-related quality of life was the secondary outcome, determined using the Short Form-8.

RESULTS

Analyses revealed no general effect for systematic treatment selection. However, there was a differential effect: systematic selection resulted in a better longer-term outcome for PDT, but not for CBT; STS-PDT patients showed a significantly larger reduction in symptom severity than RTS-PDT patients. This difference was not observed in CBT.

CONCLUSIONS

Since systematic treatment selection seems to be able to optimise treatment outcome, at least for PDT, pursuing systematic treatment assignment strategies in mental healthcare settings is a worthwhile endeavour.

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Citations

23 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:August 2010
Deposited On:27 Jan 2015 14:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:58
Publisher:Royal College of Psychiatrists
ISSN:0007-1250
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.109.072835
PubMed ID:20679260

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