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Increased gene dosage plays a predominant role in the initial stages of evolution of duplicate tem-1 beta lactamase genes


Dhar, Riddhiman; Bergmiller, Tobias; Wagner, Andreas (2014). Increased gene dosage plays a predominant role in the initial stages of evolution of duplicate tem-1 beta lactamase genes. Evolution, 68(6):1775-1791.

Abstract

Gene duplication is important in evolution, because it provides new raw material for evolutionary adaptations. Several existing hypotheses about the causes of duplicate retention and diversification differ in their emphasis on gene dosage, subfunctionalization, and neofunctionalization. Little experimental data exist on the relative importance of gene expression changes and changes in coding regions for the evolution of duplicate genes. Furthermore, we do not know how strongly the environment could affect this importance. To address these questions, we performed evolution experiments with the TEM-1 beta lactamase gene in Escherichia coli to study the initial stages of duplicate gene evolution in the laboratory. We mimicked tandem duplication by inserting two copies of the TEM-1 gene on the same plasmid. We then subjected these copies to repeated cycles of mutagenesis and selection in various environments that contained antibiotics in different combinations and concentrations. Our experiments showed that gene dosage is the most important factor in the initial stages of duplicate gene evolution, and overshadows the importance of point mutations in the coding region.

Abstract

Gene duplication is important in evolution, because it provides new raw material for evolutionary adaptations. Several existing hypotheses about the causes of duplicate retention and diversification differ in their emphasis on gene dosage, subfunctionalization, and neofunctionalization. Little experimental data exist on the relative importance of gene expression changes and changes in coding regions for the evolution of duplicate genes. Furthermore, we do not know how strongly the environment could affect this importance. To address these questions, we performed evolution experiments with the TEM-1 beta lactamase gene in Escherichia coli to study the initial stages of duplicate gene evolution in the laboratory. We mimicked tandem duplication by inserting two copies of the TEM-1 gene on the same plasmid. We then subjected these copies to repeated cycles of mutagenesis and selection in various environments that contained antibiotics in different combinations and concentrations. Our experiments showed that gene dosage is the most important factor in the initial stages of duplicate gene evolution, and overshadows the importance of point mutations in the coding region.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:20 Feb 2015 13:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:59
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0014-3820
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.12373
PubMed ID:24495000

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