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Associations between salivary alpha-amylase and catecholamines – A multilevel modeling approach


Ditzen, Beate; Ehlert, Ulrike; Nater, Urs M (2014). Associations between salivary alpha-amylase and catecholamines – A multilevel modeling approach. Biological Psychology, 103:15-18.

Abstract

Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) serves as indicator for sympathetic activity. However, previous findings on the association between aggregated sAA and other sympathetic markers, namely norepinephrine and epinephrine, were mixed. We therefore assumed that time-sensitive statistical analyses might help identifying possible associations of sAA and catecholamines. Data from two studies were analyzed. In Study 1, 13 men were examined in a randomized repeated within-subjects double-blind study with yohimbine/placebo. In Study 2, 30 men were randomized in a repeated within-subjects design to psychosocial stress/rest. Associations of repeatedly assessed sAA, norepinephrine, and epinephrine in blood were analyzed using multilevel modeling. Over the time course, sAA was significantly associated with the catecholamines (Study 1: R(2)=.43, Study 2: R(2)=.09) and both served as mediators of sAA increases. Additional exploratory analyses suggest stronger associations during challenge/stress than during placebo/rest. These findings further support sAA as marker of sympathetic activity.

Abstract

Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) serves as indicator for sympathetic activity. However, previous findings on the association between aggregated sAA and other sympathetic markers, namely norepinephrine and epinephrine, were mixed. We therefore assumed that time-sensitive statistical analyses might help identifying possible associations of sAA and catecholamines. Data from two studies were analyzed. In Study 1, 13 men were examined in a randomized repeated within-subjects double-blind study with yohimbine/placebo. In Study 2, 30 men were randomized in a repeated within-subjects design to psychosocial stress/rest. Associations of repeatedly assessed sAA, norepinephrine, and epinephrine in blood were analyzed using multilevel modeling. Over the time course, sAA was significantly associated with the catecholamines (Study 1: R(2)=.43, Study 2: R(2)=.09) and both served as mediators of sAA increases. Additional exploratory analyses suggest stronger associations during challenge/stress than during placebo/rest. These findings further support sAA as marker of sympathetic activity.

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15 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2014
Deposited On:28 Jan 2015 14:37
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 11:28
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0301-0511
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2014.08.001
PubMed ID:25132576

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