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Anacetrapib reduces progression of atherosclerosis, mainly by reducing non-HDL-cholesterol, improves lesion stability and adds to the beneficial effects of atorvastatin


Kühnast, Susan; van der Tuin, Sam J L; van der Hoorn, José W A; van Klinken, Jan B; Simic, Branko; Pieterman, Elsbet; Havekes, Louis M; Landmesser, Ulf; Lüscher, Thomas F; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Rensen, Patrick C N; Jukema, J Wouter; Princen, Hans M G (2015). Anacetrapib reduces progression of atherosclerosis, mainly by reducing non-HDL-cholesterol, improves lesion stability and adds to the beneficial effects of atorvastatin. European Heart Journal, 36(1):39-50.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The residual risk that remains after statin treatment supports the addition of other LDL-C-lowering agents and has stimulated the search for secondary treatment targets. Epidemiological studies propose HDL-C as a possible candidate. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transfers cholesteryl esters from atheroprotective HDL to atherogenic (V)LDL. The CETP inhibitor anacetrapib decreases (V)LDL-C by ∼15-40% and increases HDL-C by ∼40-140% in clinical trials. We evaluated the effects of a broad dose range of anacetrapib on atherosclerosis and HDL function, and examined possible additive/synergistic effects of anacetrapib on top of atorvastatin in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice. METHODS AND RESULTS Mice were fed a diet without or with ascending dosages of anacetrapib (0.03; 0.3; 3; 30 mg/kg/day), atorvastatin (2.4 mg/kg/day) alone or in combination with anacetrapib (0.3 mg/kg/day) for 21 weeks. Anacetrapib dose-dependently reduced CETP activity (-59 to -100%, P < 0.001), thereby decreasing non-HDL-C (-24 to -45%, P < 0.001) and increasing HDL-C (+30 to +86%, P < 0.001). Anacetrapib dose-dependently reduced the atherosclerotic lesion area (-41 to -92%, P < 0.01) and severity, increased plaque stability index and added to the effects of atorvastatin by further decreasing lesion size (-95%, P < 0.001) and severity. Analysis of covariance showed that both anacetrapib (P < 0.05) and non-HDL-C (P < 0.001), but not HDL-C (P = 0.76), independently determined lesion size. CONCLUSION Anacetrapib dose-dependently reduces atherosclerosis, and adds to the anti-atherogenic effects of atorvastatin, which is mainly ascribed to a reduction in non-HDL-C. In addition, anacetrapib improves lesion stability.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The residual risk that remains after statin treatment supports the addition of other LDL-C-lowering agents and has stimulated the search for secondary treatment targets. Epidemiological studies propose HDL-C as a possible candidate. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transfers cholesteryl esters from atheroprotective HDL to atherogenic (V)LDL. The CETP inhibitor anacetrapib decreases (V)LDL-C by ∼15-40% and increases HDL-C by ∼40-140% in clinical trials. We evaluated the effects of a broad dose range of anacetrapib on atherosclerosis and HDL function, and examined possible additive/synergistic effects of anacetrapib on top of atorvastatin in APOE*3Leiden.CETP mice. METHODS AND RESULTS Mice were fed a diet without or with ascending dosages of anacetrapib (0.03; 0.3; 3; 30 mg/kg/day), atorvastatin (2.4 mg/kg/day) alone or in combination with anacetrapib (0.3 mg/kg/day) for 21 weeks. Anacetrapib dose-dependently reduced CETP activity (-59 to -100%, P < 0.001), thereby decreasing non-HDL-C (-24 to -45%, P < 0.001) and increasing HDL-C (+30 to +86%, P < 0.001). Anacetrapib dose-dependently reduced the atherosclerotic lesion area (-41 to -92%, P < 0.01) and severity, increased plaque stability index and added to the effects of atorvastatin by further decreasing lesion size (-95%, P < 0.001) and severity. Analysis of covariance showed that both anacetrapib (P < 0.05) and non-HDL-C (P < 0.001), but not HDL-C (P = 0.76), independently determined lesion size. CONCLUSION Anacetrapib dose-dependently reduces atherosclerosis, and adds to the anti-atherogenic effects of atorvastatin, which is mainly ascribed to a reduction in non-HDL-C. In addition, anacetrapib improves lesion stability.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 January 2015
Deposited On:12 Mar 2015 07:57
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 18:59
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0195-668X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehu319
PubMed ID:25142968

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