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Dose- and time-dependent effects of genipin crosslinking on cell viability and tissue mechanics - toward clinical application for tendon repair


Fessel, Gion; Cadby, Jennifer; Wunderli, Stefania; van Weeren, René; Snedeker, Jess G (2014). Dose- and time-dependent effects of genipin crosslinking on cell viability and tissue mechanics - toward clinical application for tendon repair. Acta Biomaterialia, 10(5):1897-1906.

Abstract

The crosslinking agent genipin is increasingly invoked for the mechanical augmentation of collagen tissues and implants, and has previously been demonstrated to arrest mechanical damage accumulation in various tissues. This study established an in vitro dose-response baseline for the effects of genipin treatment on tendon cells and their matrix, with a view to in vivo application to the repair of partial tendon tears. Regression models based on a broad range of experimental data were used to delineate the range of concentrations that are likely to achieve functionally effective crosslinking, and predict the corresponding degree of cell loss and diminished metabolic activity that can be expected. On these data, it was concluded that rapid mechanical augmentation of tissue properties can only be achieved by accepting some degree of cytotoxicity, yet that post-treatment cell survival may be adequate to eventually repopulate and stabilize the tissue. On this basis, development of delivery strategies and subsequent in vivo study seems warranted.

Abstract

The crosslinking agent genipin is increasingly invoked for the mechanical augmentation of collagen tissues and implants, and has previously been demonstrated to arrest mechanical damage accumulation in various tissues. This study established an in vitro dose-response baseline for the effects of genipin treatment on tendon cells and their matrix, with a view to in vivo application to the repair of partial tendon tears. Regression models based on a broad range of experimental data were used to delineate the range of concentrations that are likely to achieve functionally effective crosslinking, and predict the corresponding degree of cell loss and diminished metabolic activity that can be expected. On these data, it was concluded that rapid mechanical augmentation of tissue properties can only be achieved by accepting some degree of cytotoxicity, yet that post-treatment cell survival may be adequate to eventually repopulate and stabilize the tissue. On this basis, development of delivery strategies and subsequent in vivo study seems warranted.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:May 2014
Deposited On:12 Feb 2015 14:49
Last Modified:27 Apr 2017 23:36
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1742-7061
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2013.12.048
PubMed ID:24384123

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