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Air suctioning during colon biopsy acquisition reduces bacterial contamination


Vavricka, S; Tutuian, R; Imhof, A; Wildi, S; Gubler, C; Fruehauf, H; Ruef, C; Fried, M (2006). Air suctioning during colon biopsy acquisition reduces bacterial contamination. Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, 63(5):AB108.

Abstract

Background and Aim: Contamination of endoscopy suites with bacteria during procedures is of concern particularly through droplets during handling of biopsy specimens. It has been advocated that suctioning while removing the biopsy forceps could help to reduce potentially hazardous bioaerosols. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of air suctioning during removal of the biopsy forceps. Materials and Methods: Airborne bacteria were collected by an impactor air-sampler (MAS-100). Fifty liters of air were collected continuously for 30 seconds at a 30 cm distance from the colonoscope suction channel. Room air samples were taken in the endoscopy suite in the morning prior to the beginning of the endoscopy program, during colonoscopy with a sham biopsy in the descending colon with and without suctioning and at the end of the procedure day. Standard 90 mm Petri dishes containing a selective medium for gram-positive cocci (CNA blood agar) were used with the impaction sampler and colony forming units/m3 (cfu) were determined. Results: Measurements were performed at fifty consecutive colonoscopies. Prior to the beginning of the endoscopy program, the bioaerosol burden in the colonoscopy suite reached a mean of 4.2 cfu/m3. During colonoscopies performed without suctioning at biopsy the bioaerosol burden increased to 29.4 cfu/m3 whereas this burden increased only to 15.1 cfu/m3 when the suctioning was applied during removal of the biopsy forceps. The difference in bioaerosol burden between suctioning and no suctioning was highly significant (p < 0.0005). At the end of the procedure day the airborne bacteria count dropped to 15.6 cfu/m3. The analysis of the colonies on the CNA blood agar identified predominantly enterococci. Staphylococci spp. and other gram-positive bacteria were rarely isolated. Conclusion: The present study indicates that the bioaerosol burden during handling of biopsy specimens is not neglectable but can be reduced by the simple habit of applying suctioning during acquisition of biopsies. This practice might be an important infection-control measure during gastrointestinal endoscopies.

Abstract

Background and Aim: Contamination of endoscopy suites with bacteria during procedures is of concern particularly through droplets during handling of biopsy specimens. It has been advocated that suctioning while removing the biopsy forceps could help to reduce potentially hazardous bioaerosols. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of air suctioning during removal of the biopsy forceps. Materials and Methods: Airborne bacteria were collected by an impactor air-sampler (MAS-100). Fifty liters of air were collected continuously for 30 seconds at a 30 cm distance from the colonoscope suction channel. Room air samples were taken in the endoscopy suite in the morning prior to the beginning of the endoscopy program, during colonoscopy with a sham biopsy in the descending colon with and without suctioning and at the end of the procedure day. Standard 90 mm Petri dishes containing a selective medium for gram-positive cocci (CNA blood agar) were used with the impaction sampler and colony forming units/m3 (cfu) were determined. Results: Measurements were performed at fifty consecutive colonoscopies. Prior to the beginning of the endoscopy program, the bioaerosol burden in the colonoscopy suite reached a mean of 4.2 cfu/m3. During colonoscopies performed without suctioning at biopsy the bioaerosol burden increased to 29.4 cfu/m3 whereas this burden increased only to 15.1 cfu/m3 when the suctioning was applied during removal of the biopsy forceps. The difference in bioaerosol burden between suctioning and no suctioning was highly significant (p < 0.0005). At the end of the procedure day the airborne bacteria count dropped to 15.6 cfu/m3. The analysis of the colonies on the CNA blood agar identified predominantly enterococci. Staphylococci spp. and other gram-positive bacteria were rarely isolated. Conclusion: The present study indicates that the bioaerosol burden during handling of biopsy specimens is not neglectable but can be reduced by the simple habit of applying suctioning during acquisition of biopsies. This practice might be an important infection-control measure during gastrointestinal endoscopies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2006
Deposited On:18 Mar 2009 11:44
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:51
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0016-5107
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2006.03.125

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