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IgE-mediated sensitization to malassezia in atopic dermatitis: More common in male patients and in head and neck type


Brodská, Petra; Panzner, Petr; Pizinger, Karel; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter (2014). IgE-mediated sensitization to malassezia in atopic dermatitis: More common in male patients and in head and neck type. Dermatitis, 25(3):120-126.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease. Malassezia, the predominant skin microbiota fungus, is considered to exacerbate AD, especially in a subset of patients with head and neck type AD (HNAD). In the present study, the relationship between AD and sensitization to Malassezia antigens was investigated.
METHODS: We assessed 173 patients with AD. The severity of eczema was determined with Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI); the type of AD, namely, head and neck type, was reported as well. The total serum IgE and specific IgE to Malassezia were determined and correlated with clinical picture of AD, sex, age, and the EASI.
RESULTS: Total IgE was elevated in 77.7% of patients. Specific IgE to Malassezia was positive (≥0.35 kU/L) in 49.1% of patients. Men were significantly more often sensitized to Malassezia antigen (58% of men vs 42% of women; P value, 0.04). Concurrently, 58% of patients with HNAD versus 42% non-HNAD patients had higher levels of specific IgE to Malassezia, this difference being nearly significant (P value, 0.06). Patients with atopy were also more frequently sensitized to Malassezia. No significant relationship between EASI and the level of total IgE or specific IgE to Malassezia was observed.
CONCLUSIONS: In our population, IgE-mediated sensitization was found in up to 49% of all patients with AD, most common in men and in head and neck type.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease. Malassezia, the predominant skin microbiota fungus, is considered to exacerbate AD, especially in a subset of patients with head and neck type AD (HNAD). In the present study, the relationship between AD and sensitization to Malassezia antigens was investigated.
METHODS: We assessed 173 patients with AD. The severity of eczema was determined with Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI); the type of AD, namely, head and neck type, was reported as well. The total serum IgE and specific IgE to Malassezia were determined and correlated with clinical picture of AD, sex, age, and the EASI.
RESULTS: Total IgE was elevated in 77.7% of patients. Specific IgE to Malassezia was positive (≥0.35 kU/L) in 49.1% of patients. Men were significantly more often sensitized to Malassezia antigen (58% of men vs 42% of women; P value, 0.04). Concurrently, 58% of patients with HNAD versus 42% non-HNAD patients had higher levels of specific IgE to Malassezia, this difference being nearly significant (P value, 0.06). Patients with atopy were also more frequently sensitized to Malassezia. No significant relationship between EASI and the level of total IgE or specific IgE to Malassezia was observed.
CONCLUSIONS: In our population, IgE-mediated sensitization was found in up to 49% of all patients with AD, most common in men and in head and neck type.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:26 Feb 2015 14:10
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 12:03
Publisher:BC Decker
ISSN:1710-3568
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/DER.0000000000000040
PubMed ID:24819285

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