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Intradermal photosensitisation facilitates stimulation of MHC class-I restricted CD8 T-cell responses of co-administered antigen


Håkerud, Monika; Waeckerle-Men, Ying; Selbo, Pål Kristian; Kündig, Thomas M; Høgset, Anders; Johansen, Pål (2014). Intradermal photosensitisation facilitates stimulation of MHC class-I restricted CD8 T-cell responses of co-administered antigen. Journal of Controlled Release, 174:143-150.

Abstract

The protection or treatment of several immunological disorders is dependent on the antigen-specific and cytotoxic CD8 T cells. However, vaccines aimed at stimulating CD8 T-cell responses are typically ineffective because vaccine antigens are primarily processed by the MHC class-II and not the MHC class-I pathway of antigen presentation: the latter requires cytosolic delivery of antigen. In order to facilitate targeting of antigen to cytosol, the antigen was combined with the photosensitiser TPCS2a (disulfonated tetraphenyl chlorin) and administered intradermally to mice. The photosensitiser was activated by illumination of the injection site. This photochemical internalization (PCI) strongly increased the stimulation of CD8 T-cell responses as measured by antigen-specific proliferation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Fluorescence microscopy showed that delivery to cytosol was TPCS2a dependent and occurred by light-induced disruption of TPCS2a- and antigen-containing endosomes. PCI-based vaccination prevented growth of malignant B16 cells as compared with vaccination without PCI. In conclusion, PCI represents a potent tool for delivery of antigens to cytosol for stimulation of cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses. This study demonstrated a first proof-of-principle for PCI-mediated immunisation with potential application in cancer immunotherapy.

Abstract

The protection or treatment of several immunological disorders is dependent on the antigen-specific and cytotoxic CD8 T cells. However, vaccines aimed at stimulating CD8 T-cell responses are typically ineffective because vaccine antigens are primarily processed by the MHC class-II and not the MHC class-I pathway of antigen presentation: the latter requires cytosolic delivery of antigen. In order to facilitate targeting of antigen to cytosol, the antigen was combined with the photosensitiser TPCS2a (disulfonated tetraphenyl chlorin) and administered intradermally to mice. The photosensitiser was activated by illumination of the injection site. This photochemical internalization (PCI) strongly increased the stimulation of CD8 T-cell responses as measured by antigen-specific proliferation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Fluorescence microscopy showed that delivery to cytosol was TPCS2a dependent and occurred by light-induced disruption of TPCS2a- and antigen-containing endosomes. PCI-based vaccination prevented growth of malignant B16 cells as compared with vaccination without PCI. In conclusion, PCI represents a potent tool for delivery of antigens to cytosol for stimulation of cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses. This study demonstrated a first proof-of-principle for PCI-mediated immunisation with potential application in cancer immunotherapy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:28 January 2014
Deposited On:12 Feb 2015 15:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:06
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0168-3659
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2013.11.017
PubMed ID:24280261

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