Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Stress and reward: long term cortisol exposure predicts the strength of sexual preference


Chumbley, J R; Hulme, O; Köchli, H; Russell, E; Van Uum, S; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Fehr, E (2014). Stress and reward: long term cortisol exposure predicts the strength of sexual preference. Physiology and Behavior, 131:33-40.

Abstract

Healthy individuals tend to consume available rewards like food and sex. This tendency is attenuated or amplified in most stress-related psychiatric conditions, so we asked if it depends on endogenous levels of the ‘canonical stress hormone’ cortisol. We unobtrusively quantified how hard healthy heterosexual men would work to consume erotic images of women versus men and also measured their exposure to endogenous cortisol in the prior two months. We used linear models to predict the strength of sexual preference from cortisol level, after accounting for other potential explanations. Heterosexual preference declines with self-reported anhedonia but increases with long term exposure to endogenous cortisol. These results suggest that cortisol may affect reward-related behavior in healthy adults.

Abstract

Healthy individuals tend to consume available rewards like food and sex. This tendency is attenuated or amplified in most stress-related psychiatric conditions, so we asked if it depends on endogenous levels of the ‘canonical stress hormone’ cortisol. We unobtrusively quantified how hard healthy heterosexual men would work to consume erotic images of women versus men and also measured their exposure to endogenous cortisol in the prior two months. We used linear models to predict the strength of sexual preference from cortisol level, after accounting for other potential explanations. Heterosexual preference declines with self-reported anhedonia but increases with long term exposure to endogenous cortisol. These results suggest that cortisol may affect reward-related behavior in healthy adults.

Statistics

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 18 Feb 2015
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:28 May 2014
Deposited On:18 Feb 2015 14:57
Last Modified:25 Mar 2017 08:10
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0031-9384
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.04.013
PubMed ID:24732415

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 861kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations