Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

High sensitivity of contact-heat evoked potentials in "snake-eye" appearance myelopathy


Ulrich, A; Min, K; Curt, A (2015). High sensitivity of contact-heat evoked potentials in "snake-eye" appearance myelopathy. Clinical Neurophysiology, 126(10):1994-2003.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the sensitivity of dermatomal contact-heat evoked potentials (dCHEPs) compared to dermatomal somatosensory evoked potentials (dSSEPs) and clinical sensory testing in patients with focal central cord myelopathy, referred to as "snake-eye" appearance myelopathy (SEAM). METHODS 33 patients with SEAM in neuroimaging underwent electrophysiological (dCHEPs, dSSEPs) and clinical testing of sensory function (light touch [LT] and pin prick [PP]) at segments above, at and below to the spinal cord lesion. RESULTS In total, 151 dermatomes were tested (39 above, 112 at/below lesion). The sensitivity of dCHEPs (97.0%) was significantly higher compared to dSSEPs (23.3%, p<0.001), PP (66.7%, p=0.003) and LT (69.7%, p=0.006), respectively. The sensitivity of dCHEPs was highest when applied one to two segments caudally to the level of spinal cord lesion in MRI. CONCLUSIONS dCHEPs are highly sensitive and superior to dSSEPs and clinical sensory testing in the diagnosis of SEAM. SIGNIFICANCE dCHEPs may complement the diagnosis in focal central cord myelopathies where clinical testing of sensory function and dSSEPs are less sensitive to provide conclusive findings.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the sensitivity of dermatomal contact-heat evoked potentials (dCHEPs) compared to dermatomal somatosensory evoked potentials (dSSEPs) and clinical sensory testing in patients with focal central cord myelopathy, referred to as "snake-eye" appearance myelopathy (SEAM). METHODS 33 patients with SEAM in neuroimaging underwent electrophysiological (dCHEPs, dSSEPs) and clinical testing of sensory function (light touch [LT] and pin prick [PP]) at segments above, at and below to the spinal cord lesion. RESULTS In total, 151 dermatomes were tested (39 above, 112 at/below lesion). The sensitivity of dCHEPs (97.0%) was significantly higher compared to dSSEPs (23.3%, p<0.001), PP (66.7%, p=0.003) and LT (69.7%, p=0.006), respectively. The sensitivity of dCHEPs was highest when applied one to two segments caudally to the level of spinal cord lesion in MRI. CONCLUSIONS dCHEPs are highly sensitive and superior to dSSEPs and clinical sensory testing in the diagnosis of SEAM. SIGNIFICANCE dCHEPs may complement the diagnosis in focal central cord myelopathies where clinical testing of sensory function and dSSEPs are less sensitive to provide conclusive findings.

Statistics

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:16 January 2015
Deposited On:12 Mar 2015 12:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:08
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1388-2457
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2014.12.020
PubMed ID:25701427

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations