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Interruptibility of software developers and its prediction using psycho-physiological sensors


Züger, Manuela; Fritz, Thomas (2015). Interruptibility of software developers and its prediction using psycho-physiological sensors. In: CHI 2015, Seoul, South Korea, 18 April 2015 - 23 April 2015.

Abstract

Interruptions of knowledge workers are common and can cause a high cost if they happen at inopportune moments. With recent advances in psycho-physiological sensors and their link to cognitive and emotional states, we are interested whether such sensors might be used to measure interruptibility of a knowledge worker. In a lab and a field study with a total of twenty software developers, we examined the use of psycho-physiological sensors in a real-world context. The results show that a Naive Bayes classifier based on psychophysiological features can be used to automatically assess states of a knowledge worker’s interruptibility with high accuracy in the lab as well as in the field. Our results demonstrate the potential of these sensors to avoid expensive interruptions in a real-world context. Based on brief interviews, we further discuss the usage of such an interruptibility measure and interruption support for software developers.

Abstract

Interruptions of knowledge workers are common and can cause a high cost if they happen at inopportune moments. With recent advances in psycho-physiological sensors and their link to cognitive and emotional states, we are interested whether such sensors might be used to measure interruptibility of a knowledge worker. In a lab and a field study with a total of twenty software developers, we examined the use of psycho-physiological sensors in a real-world context. The results show that a Naive Bayes classifier based on psychophysiological features can be used to automatically assess states of a knowledge worker’s interruptibility with high accuracy in the lab as well as in the field. Our results demonstrate the potential of these sensors to avoid expensive interruptions in a real-world context. Based on brief interviews, we further discuss the usage of such an interruptibility measure and interruption support for software developers.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:23 April 2015
Deposited On:01 Apr 2015 13:29
Last Modified:16 Aug 2017 09:42
Publisher:ACM
ISBN:978-1-4503-3145-6
Related URLs:https://chi2015.acm.org/ (Organisation)
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2702593 (Publisher)
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:11922

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