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A systematic review of cytogenetic studies conducted in human populations exposed to cadmium compounds


Verougstraete, Violaine; Lison, Dominique; Hotz, Philipp (2002). A systematic review of cytogenetic studies conducted in human populations exposed to cadmium compounds. Mutation research, 511(1):15-43.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Exposure to cadmium fumes or dusts has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer and the characterisation of the genotoxic potential of cadmium compounds is, among other possible mechanisms, an important element in the assessment of the carcinogenic hazard of the element. While there is some evidence that in experimental systems, cadmium compounds may exert genotoxic effects, the results of the epidemiological studies having examined cytogenetic endpoints in humans exposed to cadmium appear conflicting. Therefore, a systematic review was undertaken to assess whether a cytogenetic effect of cadmium exposure is supported by the studies with the strongest design. METHODS The relevant literature was identified through several databases and assessed with a check-list by two reviewers. Causes of heterogeneity between studies were looked for. Results were extracted and the strength of the evidence was evaluated with causality criteria. RESULTS No studies met the criteria for being considered as very convincing. Several factors were identified that could explain contradictory findings (small sample size, selection bias, insufficient characterisation of exposure, lack of consideration of confounders) but their actual impact could not be conclusively assessed with the published information. Importantly, it should be recognised that the absence of a clear mechanism for the cytogenetic action of cadmium compounds did not allow to select the most appropriate endpoint to be examined. CONCLUSIONS No clear association between cadmium exposure and cytogenetic endpoint appeared but no definite conclusion can be drawn from the existing studies in humans. Future research efforts should mainly focus on experimental studies to understand how cadmium compounds could produce genotoxic/carcinogenic effects, in order to target the most relevant endpoint to be examined in humans.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Exposure to cadmium fumes or dusts has been associated with an increased risk of lung cancer and the characterisation of the genotoxic potential of cadmium compounds is, among other possible mechanisms, an important element in the assessment of the carcinogenic hazard of the element. While there is some evidence that in experimental systems, cadmium compounds may exert genotoxic effects, the results of the epidemiological studies having examined cytogenetic endpoints in humans exposed to cadmium appear conflicting. Therefore, a systematic review was undertaken to assess whether a cytogenetic effect of cadmium exposure is supported by the studies with the strongest design. METHODS The relevant literature was identified through several databases and assessed with a check-list by two reviewers. Causes of heterogeneity between studies were looked for. Results were extracted and the strength of the evidence was evaluated with causality criteria. RESULTS No studies met the criteria for being considered as very convincing. Several factors were identified that could explain contradictory findings (small sample size, selection bias, insufficient characterisation of exposure, lack of consideration of confounders) but their actual impact could not be conclusively assessed with the published information. Importantly, it should be recognised that the absence of a clear mechanism for the cytogenetic action of cadmium compounds did not allow to select the most appropriate endpoint to be examined. CONCLUSIONS No clear association between cadmium exposure and cytogenetic endpoint appeared but no definite conclusion can be drawn from the existing studies in humans. Future research efforts should mainly focus on experimental studies to understand how cadmium compounds could produce genotoxic/carcinogenic effects, in order to target the most relevant endpoint to be examined in humans.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2002
Deposited On:21 May 2015 10:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:15
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0027-5107
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S1383-5742(01)00070-9
PubMed ID:11906840

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