Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Threshold relations in subsurface stormflow: 2. The fill and spill hypothesis


Tromp-van Meerveld, H J; McDonnell, J J (2006). Threshold relations in subsurface stormflow: 2. The fill and spill hypothesis. Water Resources Research, 42(2):online.

Abstract

Analysis of subsurface stormflow from 147 storms at the 20 m long trench in the Panola Mountain Research Watershed by Tromp-van Meerveld and McDonnell (2006a) showed that there was a distinct 55 mm precipitation threshold for significant subsurface stormflow production. This second paper in the series investigates the processes responsible for this threshold response. We installed a dense spatial array of maximum rise crest stage gauges and recording wells on the hillslope and studied the temporal and spatial patterns of transient saturation at the soil-bedrock interface and its relation to subsurface stormflow measured at the trench face. Results show that while transient groundwater developed on parts of the hillslope during events smaller than 55 mm, it was not until more than 55 mm of rain fell before bedrock depressions on the hillslope were filled, water spilled over microtopographic relief in the bedrock surface, and the subsurface saturated areas became connected to the trench. When connectivity was achieved, the instantaneous subsurface stormflow rate increased more than fivefold compared to before the subsurface saturated areas were connected to the trench face. Total subsurface stormflow was more than 75 times larger when connectivity was achieved compared to when connectivity was not achieved. The fill and spill hypothesis presented in this paper is a process explanation for the observed threshold behavior of Tromp-van Meerveld and McDonnell (2006a), thereby linking patterns and processes.

Abstract

Analysis of subsurface stormflow from 147 storms at the 20 m long trench in the Panola Mountain Research Watershed by Tromp-van Meerveld and McDonnell (2006a) showed that there was a distinct 55 mm precipitation threshold for significant subsurface stormflow production. This second paper in the series investigates the processes responsible for this threshold response. We installed a dense spatial array of maximum rise crest stage gauges and recording wells on the hillslope and studied the temporal and spatial patterns of transient saturation at the soil-bedrock interface and its relation to subsurface stormflow measured at the trench face. Results show that while transient groundwater developed on parts of the hillslope during events smaller than 55 mm, it was not until more than 55 mm of rain fell before bedrock depressions on the hillslope were filled, water spilled over microtopographic relief in the bedrock surface, and the subsurface saturated areas became connected to the trench. When connectivity was achieved, the instantaneous subsurface stormflow rate increased more than fivefold compared to before the subsurface saturated areas were connected to the trench face. Total subsurface stormflow was more than 75 times larger when connectivity was achieved compared to when connectivity was not achieved. The fill and spill hypothesis presented in this paper is a process explanation for the observed threshold behavior of Tromp-van Meerveld and McDonnell (2006a), thereby linking patterns and processes.

Statistics

Citations

175 citations in Web of Science®
254 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

29 downloads since deposited on 22 May 2015
14 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:22 May 2015 14:27
Last Modified:22 May 2016 11:15
Publisher:American Geophysical Union
ISSN:0043-1397
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1029/2004WR003800

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 2MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations