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Safety and efficiency of the Ottawa Ankle Rule in a Swiss population with ankle sprains


Can, U; Ruckert, R; Held, U; Buchmann, P; Platz, A; Bachmann, L M (2008). Safety and efficiency of the Ottawa Ankle Rule in a Swiss population with ankle sprains. Swiss Medical Weekly, 138(19-20):292-296.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined the accuracy of the Ottawa Ankle Rule (OAR) to rule out ankle and mid-foot fractures in patients presenting with acute ankle sprain and differences of accuracy between surgeons and non-surgeons. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Swiss urban secondary care centre. PARTICIPANTS: Between September 2001 and October 2002 359 patients presented with a case of ankle sprain. Of these, 251 patients both met recruitment criteria and provided data for this study. A group of surgeons and non-surgeons assessed the OAR and all patients underwent blinded radiographic assessment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity, specificity of the OAR. RESULTS: Of the 251 patients with ankle sprains 33 had an ankle fracture (13%) and none had a mid-foot fracture. All cases with a fracture had a positive OAR result (sensitivity 100% 95% CI; 89-100) and of 218 patients without a fracture, the OAR was negative in 45 cases (specificity 21%; 16-27). In the subgroup of patients assessed by surgeons, sensitivity was 100% (77-100) and specificity was 32% (20-46). In the non-surgical group, sensitivity was also 100% (82-100) but specificity was lower (17% (11-23). CONCLUSIONS: This validation study of the OAR in a Swiss setting produced similar results than those published previously in various other settings. We found differences in the performance of the rule between surgical and non-surgical staff indicating that the OAR has its interpretation component which is more difficult to judge properly by well-instructed non-surgical assessors.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined the accuracy of the Ottawa Ankle Rule (OAR) to rule out ankle and mid-foot fractures in patients presenting with acute ankle sprain and differences of accuracy between surgeons and non-surgeons. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Swiss urban secondary care centre. PARTICIPANTS: Between September 2001 and October 2002 359 patients presented with a case of ankle sprain. Of these, 251 patients both met recruitment criteria and provided data for this study. A group of surgeons and non-surgeons assessed the OAR and all patients underwent blinded radiographic assessment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity, specificity of the OAR. RESULTS: Of the 251 patients with ankle sprains 33 had an ankle fracture (13%) and none had a mid-foot fracture. All cases with a fracture had a positive OAR result (sensitivity 100% 95% CI; 89-100) and of 218 patients without a fracture, the OAR was negative in 45 cases (specificity 21%; 16-27). In the subgroup of patients assessed by surgeons, sensitivity was 100% (77-100) and specificity was 32% (20-46). In the non-surgical group, sensitivity was also 100% (82-100) but specificity was lower (17% (11-23). CONCLUSIONS: This validation study of the OAR in a Swiss setting produced similar results than those published previously in various other settings. We found differences in the performance of the rule between surgical and non-surgical staff indicating that the OAR has its interpretation component which is more difficult to judge properly by well-instructed non-surgical assessors.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:23 Jan 2009 19:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:52
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
Additional Information:Free full text article
Official URL:http://www.smw.ch/docs/pdf200x/2008/19/smw-12061.PDF
Related URLs:http://www.smw.ch/dfe/set_archiv.asp (Publisher)
PubMed ID:18491243

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