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Among-population variation in monthly and annual survival of the Baja California Tree Frog, Pseudacris hypochondriaca curta, in desert oases of Baja California Sur, Mexico


Luja, V H; Rodriguez-Estrella, R; Schaub, M; Schmidt, B R (2015). Among-population variation in monthly and annual survival of the Baja California Tree Frog, Pseudacris hypochondriaca curta, in desert oases of Baja California Sur, Mexico. Herpetological Conservation and Biology, 10(1):112-122.

Abstract

Survival is an important component of the demography of an animal. We estimated monthly and annual survival probabilities of three populations of the Baja California Treefrog (Pseudacris hypochondriaca curta) inhabiting desert oases of Baja California Sur, Mexico. We used data from a two-year mark recapture study to estimate survival. Recapture probabilities varied widely among months and there was no clear temporal pattern underlying the fluctuations. Annual survival was 27 and 29% for two populations and 1% for the third population. This implies that the populations, particularly the third one, can persist only if there is steady and high recruitment. With annual survival as low as 1–29%, a lack of recruitment could quickly cause local extinction. Because immigration seems unlikely in these populations due to their isolation from other breeding populations, recruits must be produced locally. Non-native fish, crayfish, and frogs that prey on tadpoles may therefore be a threat for the persistence of the populations.

Abstract

Survival is an important component of the demography of an animal. We estimated monthly and annual survival probabilities of three populations of the Baja California Treefrog (Pseudacris hypochondriaca curta) inhabiting desert oases of Baja California Sur, Mexico. We used data from a two-year mark recapture study to estimate survival. Recapture probabilities varied widely among months and there was no clear temporal pattern underlying the fluctuations. Annual survival was 27 and 29% for two populations and 1% for the third population. This implies that the populations, particularly the third one, can persist only if there is steady and high recruitment. With annual survival as low as 1–29%, a lack of recruitment could quickly cause local extinction. Because immigration seems unlikely in these populations due to their isolation from other breeding populations, recruits must be produced locally. Non-native fish, crayfish, and frogs that prey on tadpoles may therefore be a threat for the persistence of the populations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:amphibian, treefrog, Pseudacris, demography, survival, recruitmet, invasive species, conservation biology, oasis, Mexico
Language:English
Date:14 June 2015
Deposited On:26 Jun 2015 09:19
Last Modified:28 Apr 2017 00:35
Publisher:Herpetological Conservation and Biology
ISSN:1931-7603
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.herpconbio.org/

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