Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Pacing strategy in male elite and age group 100 km ultra-marathoners


Knechtle, Beat; Rosemann, Thomas; Zingg, Matthias A; Stiefel, Michael; Rüst, Christoph A (2015). Pacing strategy in male elite and age group 100 km ultra-marathoners. Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, 6:71-80.

Abstract

Pacing strategy has been investigated in elite 100 km and elite 161 km (100 mile) ultra-marathoners, but not in age group ultra-marathoners. This study investigated changes in running speed over segments in male elite and age group 100 km ultra-marathoners with the assumption that running speed would decrease over segments with increasing age of the athlete. Running speed during segments in male elite and age group finishers for 5-year age groups (ie, 18-24 to 65-69 years) in the 100 km Lauf Biel in Switzerland was investigated during the 2000-2009 period. Average running speed over segment time station (TS) TS1-TS2 (56.1 km) was compared with running speed Start-TS1 (38 km) and Start-TS3 (76.7 km) and running speed TS2-TS3 was compared with running speed Start-Finish. For the top ten athletes in each edition, running speed decreased from 2000 to 2009 for TS1-TS2 and TS2-TS3 (P<0.0001) but not in TS3-Finish (P>0.05). During TS1-TS2, athletes were running at 98.0%±2.1% of the running speed of Start-TS1. In TS2-TS3, they were running at 94.6%±3.4% of the running speed of TS1-TS2. In TS3-Finish, they were running at 95.5%±3.8% of running speed in TS2-TS3. For age group athletes, running speed decreased in TS1-TS2 and TS2-TS3. In TS3-Finish, running speed remained unchanged with the exception of the age group 40-44 years for which running speed increased. Running speed showed the largest decrease in the age group 18-24 years. To summarize, the top ten athletes in each edition maintained their running speed in the last segment (TS3-Finish) although running speed decreased over the first two segments (TS1-TS2 and TS2-TS3). The best pacers were athletes in the age group 40-44 years, who were able to achieve negative pacing in the last segment (TS3-Finish) of the race. The negative pacing in the last segment (TS3-Finish) was likely due to environmental conditions, such as early dawn and the flat circuit in segment TS3-Finish of the race.

Abstract

Pacing strategy has been investigated in elite 100 km and elite 161 km (100 mile) ultra-marathoners, but not in age group ultra-marathoners. This study investigated changes in running speed over segments in male elite and age group 100 km ultra-marathoners with the assumption that running speed would decrease over segments with increasing age of the athlete. Running speed during segments in male elite and age group finishers for 5-year age groups (ie, 18-24 to 65-69 years) in the 100 km Lauf Biel in Switzerland was investigated during the 2000-2009 period. Average running speed over segment time station (TS) TS1-TS2 (56.1 km) was compared with running speed Start-TS1 (38 km) and Start-TS3 (76.7 km) and running speed TS2-TS3 was compared with running speed Start-Finish. For the top ten athletes in each edition, running speed decreased from 2000 to 2009 for TS1-TS2 and TS2-TS3 (P<0.0001) but not in TS3-Finish (P>0.05). During TS1-TS2, athletes were running at 98.0%±2.1% of the running speed of Start-TS1. In TS2-TS3, they were running at 94.6%±3.4% of the running speed of TS1-TS2. In TS3-Finish, they were running at 95.5%±3.8% of running speed in TS2-TS3. For age group athletes, running speed decreased in TS1-TS2 and TS2-TS3. In TS3-Finish, running speed remained unchanged with the exception of the age group 40-44 years for which running speed increased. Running speed showed the largest decrease in the age group 18-24 years. To summarize, the top ten athletes in each edition maintained their running speed in the last segment (TS3-Finish) although running speed decreased over the first two segments (TS1-TS2 and TS2-TS3). The best pacers were athletes in the age group 40-44 years, who were able to achieve negative pacing in the last segment (TS3-Finish) of the race. The negative pacing in the last segment (TS3-Finish) was likely due to environmental conditions, such as early dawn and the flat circuit in segment TS3-Finish of the race.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

14 downloads since deposited on 01 Jul 2015
10 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:01 Jul 2015 14:17
Last Modified:05 Aug 2017 05:10
Publisher:Dove Medical Press Ltd.
ISSN:1179-1543
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2147/OAJSM.S79568
PubMed ID:25848325

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0)

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations