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Entrepreneurial rights as human rights : Why economic rights must include the human right to science and the freedom to grow through innovation


Aerni, Philipp (2015). Entrepreneurial rights as human rights : Why economic rights must include the human right to science and the freedom to grow through innovation. Cambridge: Banson.

Abstract

The contemporary human rights debate is mostly concerned with the protection of people affected by change that is beyond their control. But what about those who make use of their basic economic rights to facilitate economic and social change? Do these agents of change need protection and, if so, how do their activities relate to the current debate on human rights?

In this book, the historical importance of innovative entrepreneurs as agents of change who indirectly contribute to a more humane world by enhancing access to basic human rights is illustrated. However, entrepreneurial rights tend to be neglected in economic and legal theory as well as in the global debate on human rights. Philipp Aerni argues that this neglect has its roots in the implicit assumption that entrepreneurs must surely know how to help themselves and therefore do not require special attention from a human rights perpective. The fact ist, however, that those most vulnerable to human rights offences, especially in the developing world, are those who have failed to obtain formal employment ard are therefore self-employed by default.

Abstract

The contemporary human rights debate is mostly concerned with the protection of people affected by change that is beyond their control. But what about those who make use of their basic economic rights to facilitate economic and social change? Do these agents of change need protection and, if so, how do their activities relate to the current debate on human rights?

In this book, the historical importance of innovative entrepreneurs as agents of change who indirectly contribute to a more humane world by enhancing access to basic human rights is illustrated. However, entrepreneurial rights tend to be neglected in economic and legal theory as well as in the global debate on human rights. Philipp Aerni argues that this neglect has its roots in the implicit assumption that entrepreneurs must surely know how to help themselves and therefore do not require special attention from a human rights perpective. The fact ist, however, that those most vulnerable to human rights offences, especially in the developing world, are those who have failed to obtain formal employment ard are therefore self-employed by default.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Monograph
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Center for Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:June 2015
Deposited On:17 Jul 2015 08:55
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 13:18
Publisher:Banson
Number of Pages:100
ISBN:978-0-9932932-2-1
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:http://www.ourplanet.com/rights/Aerni_Complete.pdf
Related URLs:http://www.ccrs.uzh.ch (Author)
http://www.ourplanet.com/rights/index.php (Publisher)

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