Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Das Ausmass der transfusionsassoziierten HIV-Infektionen in der Schweiz bis 1994: eine aktualisierte Schätzung


Zwahlen, M; Bosshard, H; Kammerlander, R; Frey-Wettstein, M; Marti, Bernard; Somaini, Bertino (1995). Das Ausmass der transfusionsassoziierten HIV-Infektionen in der Schweiz bis 1994: eine aktualisierte Schätzung. Swiss Medical Weekly, 125(36):1663-72.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The first report on transfusion-associated HIV infections was published in the USA in 1982. The first case reports in Switzerland were published in 1986. So far there has never been a methodologically sound answer to the question of how many persons were infected with HIV by receiving transfusions in Switzerland before the introduction of universal HIV blood donor screening.
METHODS: The following available data sources were analyzed simultaneously: firstly, the results of the look-back study conducted in 1993, secondly, the reports of HIV infections and AIDS cases in the national surveillance system, and, thirdly, the claims for compensation for HIV-infected transfusion recipients and hemophiliacs. Two methodologically different and independent estimates were obtained. Firstly, the coverage of the look-back study was estimated, which made it possible to calculate the total number of documentable transfusion-associated HIV infections in Switzerland. Secondly, matching was performed on the cases in the look-back study and the reports in the national surveillance system. Applying formulas of capture-recapture designs provided a second estimate of the total number of documentable transfusion-associated HIV infections. The claims for compensation were used to corroborate the estimates obtained.
RESULTS: The two methods produced almost identical figures which were corroborated by the number of claims for compensation. It is therefore estimated that 80 to 100 persons in Switzerland may have been diagnosed as having HIV infection because of transfusions in Switzerland in the years after 1980. The last five known infections occurred in 1986 (four) and, after termination of the look-back study, in 1994 (one). However, the estimate of 80 to 100 does not include individuals who were infected before 1986 and died soon--within weeks or a few months--after the transfusion without diagnosis of HIV infection being possible.
CONCLUSION: This estimate of the total number of transfusion-associated HIV infections in Switzerland is approximately half earlier published ones. In addition, the present study will probably reduce the remaining uncertainties about the size of these iatrogenic HIV infections in the 1980s.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The first report on transfusion-associated HIV infections was published in the USA in 1982. The first case reports in Switzerland were published in 1986. So far there has never been a methodologically sound answer to the question of how many persons were infected with HIV by receiving transfusions in Switzerland before the introduction of universal HIV blood donor screening.
METHODS: The following available data sources were analyzed simultaneously: firstly, the results of the look-back study conducted in 1993, secondly, the reports of HIV infections and AIDS cases in the national surveillance system, and, thirdly, the claims for compensation for HIV-infected transfusion recipients and hemophiliacs. Two methodologically different and independent estimates were obtained. Firstly, the coverage of the look-back study was estimated, which made it possible to calculate the total number of documentable transfusion-associated HIV infections in Switzerland. Secondly, matching was performed on the cases in the look-back study and the reports in the national surveillance system. Applying formulas of capture-recapture designs provided a second estimate of the total number of documentable transfusion-associated HIV infections. The claims for compensation were used to corroborate the estimates obtained.
RESULTS: The two methods produced almost identical figures which were corroborated by the number of claims for compensation. It is therefore estimated that 80 to 100 persons in Switzerland may have been diagnosed as having HIV infection because of transfusions in Switzerland in the years after 1980. The last five known infections occurred in 1986 (four) and, after termination of the look-back study, in 1994 (one). However, the estimate of 80 to 100 does not include individuals who were infected before 1986 and died soon--within weeks or a few months--after the transfusion without diagnosis of HIV infection being possible.
CONCLUSION: This estimate of the total number of transfusion-associated HIV infections in Switzerland is approximately half earlier published ones. In addition, the present study will probably reduce the remaining uncertainties about the size of these iatrogenic HIV infections in the 1980s.

Statistics

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Other titles:The extent of transfusion-associated HIV infections in Switzerland until 1994: an updated estimate
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:9 September 1995
Deposited On:03 Jul 2015 14:08
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:18
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
PubMed ID:7481620

Download

Full text not available from this repository.

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations