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Alternative nighttime nutrition regimens in glycogen storage disease type I: a controlled crossover study


Hochuli, Michel; Christ, Emanuel; Meienberg, Fabian; Lehmann, Roger; Krützfeldt, Jan; Baumgartner, Matthias R (2015). Alternative nighttime nutrition regimens in glycogen storage disease type I: a controlled crossover study. Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease, 38(6):1093-1098.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Traditional approaches for nighttime glycemic control in glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) include continuous tube feeding, or ingestion of uncooked corn starch (CS) at bedtime. A modified corn starch (MCS) has been shown to prolong euglycemia in some patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether stable nighttime glucose control can be achieved with other types of slowly digested carbohydrates in adult GSDI patients.
METHODS: In this cross-over study, nocturnal glucose control and fasting times were assessed with three different nocturnal nutrition regimens in five patients, using continuous glucose monitoring (CGMS) in an outpatient everyday life setting. For each patient, continuous glucose profiles were measured after ingestion of (1) CS, (2) MCS or (3) a pasta meal at bedtime, during 5 to 6 consecutive nights for each regimen.
RESULTS: Stable nocturnal glucose control was achieved for all patients with a pasta meal, with a mean duration of glycemia >3.5 mmol/l of 7.6 h (range 5.7-10.8), and >4 mmol/l of 7 h (5.2-9.2), similar to CS and MCS. Fasting glucose before breakfast on workdays (after 7.1 ± 0.8 h) was not significantly different between the three interventions (CS 4.1 ± 0.5 mmol/l, MCS 4.6 ± 0.7 mmol/l, pasta 4.3 ± 0.9 mmol/l). During prolonged fasting on weekends, longer duration of normoglycemia was achieved with CS or MCS than with pasta.
CONCLUSION: Consumption of cooked pasta is a suitable and more palatable alternative to uncooked corn starch to achieve nighttime glucose control in adult patients with GSDI.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Traditional approaches for nighttime glycemic control in glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI) include continuous tube feeding, or ingestion of uncooked corn starch (CS) at bedtime. A modified corn starch (MCS) has been shown to prolong euglycemia in some patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether stable nighttime glucose control can be achieved with other types of slowly digested carbohydrates in adult GSDI patients.
METHODS: In this cross-over study, nocturnal glucose control and fasting times were assessed with three different nocturnal nutrition regimens in five patients, using continuous glucose monitoring (CGMS) in an outpatient everyday life setting. For each patient, continuous glucose profiles were measured after ingestion of (1) CS, (2) MCS or (3) a pasta meal at bedtime, during 5 to 6 consecutive nights for each regimen.
RESULTS: Stable nocturnal glucose control was achieved for all patients with a pasta meal, with a mean duration of glycemia >3.5 mmol/l of 7.6 h (range 5.7-10.8), and >4 mmol/l of 7 h (5.2-9.2), similar to CS and MCS. Fasting glucose before breakfast on workdays (after 7.1 ± 0.8 h) was not significantly different between the three interventions (CS 4.1 ± 0.5 mmol/l, MCS 4.6 ± 0.7 mmol/l, pasta 4.3 ± 0.9 mmol/l). During prolonged fasting on weekends, longer duration of normoglycemia was achieved with CS or MCS than with pasta.
CONCLUSION: Consumption of cooked pasta is a suitable and more palatable alternative to uncooked corn starch to achieve nighttime glucose control in adult patients with GSDI.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Endocrinology and Diabetology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:25 June 2015
Deposited On:17 Jul 2015 08:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:18
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0141-8955
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10545-015-9864-2
PubMed ID:26109257

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