Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Oxidative stress markers in saliva and periodontal disease status: modulation during pregnancy and postpartum


Gümüş, Pınar; Emingil, Gülnur; Öztürk, Veli-Özgen; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Bostanci, Nagihan (2015). Oxidative stress markers in saliva and periodontal disease status: modulation during pregnancy and postpartum. BMC Infectious Diseases, 15(261):online.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Periodontal diseases may affect local and systemic inflammation, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. This systemic health burden could compromise the outcome of pregnancy in expectant mothers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxidative stress markers, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and total bacterial loads in the saliva of pregnant and postpartum women, and to investigate their association with periodontal disease severity.
METHODS: A total of 187 women were originally recruited for this case-control study, assigned to the following groups a) pregnant group, b) postpartum group: the pregnant group re-evaluated 6 months after giving birth, c) control group: systemically healthy and non-pregnant women. The levels of the studied oxidative stress markers in saliva were measured by commercially available kits.
RESULTS: The levels of salivary 8-OHdG were significantly elevated in the pregnant, compared with the control group. Although salivary 8-OHdG levels slightly decreased after giving birth (postpartum group), the difference did not reach significance. In contrast, the activity of antioxidant enzyme GPx in saliva was significantly lower in the pregnant than the control group. Although no differences in lipid peroxidation (represented by TBARS) were observed between the pregnant and control groups, after giving birth TBARS levels were significantly lowered. Only in the postpartum and control groups did clinical measurements of periodontal disease severity correlate with oxidative stress markers. Interestingly, there were no such correlations with TBARS in the pregnant and postpartum groups.
CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows changes in the oxidant/antioxidant balance in saliva during pregnancy and after birth, which may be affected by periodontal health status in the latter case. Whether this is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, or not, remains to be elucidated. Early identification of ROS markers in saliva may be of clinical value in the periodontal management of pregnant women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Periodontal diseases may affect local and systemic inflammation, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. This systemic health burden could compromise the outcome of pregnancy in expectant mothers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxidative stress markers, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and total bacterial loads in the saliva of pregnant and postpartum women, and to investigate their association with periodontal disease severity.
METHODS: A total of 187 women were originally recruited for this case-control study, assigned to the following groups a) pregnant group, b) postpartum group: the pregnant group re-evaluated 6 months after giving birth, c) control group: systemically healthy and non-pregnant women. The levels of the studied oxidative stress markers in saliva were measured by commercially available kits.
RESULTS: The levels of salivary 8-OHdG were significantly elevated in the pregnant, compared with the control group. Although salivary 8-OHdG levels slightly decreased after giving birth (postpartum group), the difference did not reach significance. In contrast, the activity of antioxidant enzyme GPx in saliva was significantly lower in the pregnant than the control group. Although no differences in lipid peroxidation (represented by TBARS) were observed between the pregnant and control groups, after giving birth TBARS levels were significantly lowered. Only in the postpartum and control groups did clinical measurements of periodontal disease severity correlate with oxidative stress markers. Interestingly, there were no such correlations with TBARS in the pregnant and postpartum groups.
CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows changes in the oxidant/antioxidant balance in saliva during pregnancy and after birth, which may be affected by periodontal health status in the latter case. Whether this is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, or not, remains to be elucidated. Early identification of ROS markers in saliva may be of clinical value in the periodontal management of pregnant women.

Statistics

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

38 downloads since deposited on 17 Jul 2015
22 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Institute of Oral Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:17 Jul 2015 09:34
Last Modified:09 Aug 2017 08:02
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2334
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12879-015-1003-z
Related URLs:http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2334/15/261 (Publisher)
PubMed ID:26152310

Download

Download PDF  'Oxidative stress markers in saliva and periodontal disease status: modulation during pregnancy and postpartum'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 848kB
View at publisher
Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)