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Parathyroid hormone is related to dysplasia and a higher rate of distal colorectal adenoma in women but not men


Aigner, Elmar; Stadlmayr, Andreas; Huber-Schönauer, Ursula; Zwerina, Jochen; Husar-Memmer, Emma; Niederseer, David; Eder, Sebastian K; Stickel, Felix; Pirich, Christian; Schett, Georg; Patsch, Wolfgang; Datz, Christian (2015). Parathyroid hormone is related to dysplasia and a higher rate of distal colorectal adenoma in women but not men. Hormones and Cancer, 6(4):153-160.

Abstract

Molecular and clinical observations provide evidence for a potential role of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in colorectal cancer development. We therefore aimed to assess the association of PTH with regard to colorectal cancer precursor lesions. A cohort of 1432 participants, 777 men, 58.4 ± 9.6 years and 701 women, 59.1 ± 10.6 years, undergoing screening colonoscopy were allocated to PTH serum concentrations either above or below 55 ng/L. The number, localization, size, and histology of the polypoid lesions detected during screening colonoscopy were recorded according to PTH serum concentrations. Serum PTH concentrations were not different between men and women. Women with PTH serum concentrations above the cut-off had significantly more adenomas (13/40; 32.5 %) of the distal colon compared to women below the cut-off (91/659; 13.8 %; P = 0.001). Additionally, the rate of dysplasia in adenomas of the distal colon was higher in women with high compared to low PTH concentrations (P = 0.001). These findings remained robust after adjustments for serum vitamin D, age, plasma creatinine, BMI, diabetes, and liver steatosis. No associations were observed between serum PTH concentrations and colorectal lesions in men. These data suggest that elevated PTH serum concentrations might have a role in colorectal cancer development as indicated by higher rates of adenomas, specifically with dysplasia, in women. The role of PTH in colon carcinogenesis and its sex specificity deserve further study.

Abstract

Molecular and clinical observations provide evidence for a potential role of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in colorectal cancer development. We therefore aimed to assess the association of PTH with regard to colorectal cancer precursor lesions. A cohort of 1432 participants, 777 men, 58.4 ± 9.6 years and 701 women, 59.1 ± 10.6 years, undergoing screening colonoscopy were allocated to PTH serum concentrations either above or below 55 ng/L. The number, localization, size, and histology of the polypoid lesions detected during screening colonoscopy were recorded according to PTH serum concentrations. Serum PTH concentrations were not different between men and women. Women with PTH serum concentrations above the cut-off had significantly more adenomas (13/40; 32.5 %) of the distal colon compared to women below the cut-off (91/659; 13.8 %; P = 0.001). Additionally, the rate of dysplasia in adenomas of the distal colon was higher in women with high compared to low PTH concentrations (P = 0.001). These findings remained robust after adjustments for serum vitamin D, age, plasma creatinine, BMI, diabetes, and liver steatosis. No associations were observed between serum PTH concentrations and colorectal lesions in men. These data suggest that elevated PTH serum concentrations might have a role in colorectal cancer development as indicated by higher rates of adenomas, specifically with dysplasia, in women. The role of PTH in colon carcinogenesis and its sex specificity deserve further study.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2015
Deposited On:23 Jul 2015 08:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:19
Publisher:Springer New York LLC
ISSN:1868-8497
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12672-015-0227-0
PubMed ID:26021763

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