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Chlamydiae in free-ranging and captive frogs in Switzerland


Blumer, C; Zimmermann, D R; Weilenmann, R; Vaughan, L; Pospischil, A (2007). Chlamydiae in free-ranging and captive frogs in Switzerland. Veterinary Pathology, 44(2):144-150.

Abstract

A total of 210 frog samples originating either from a mass mortality (1991/1992) or from routine postmortem investigations of the years 1990 to 2004 were examined retrospectively for a possible involvement of Chlamydiae. For a prevalence study of Chlamydia in a selected Swiss amphibian population, 403 samples from free-ranging Rana temporaria were examined. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody against chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, and a 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by DNA sequencing were performed on the formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues. Using PCR, 8 of 54 (14.8%) frog samples from the mass mortality (1991/1992) were positive for Chlamydia suis S45. A control group of healthy Xenopus laevis had 3 of 38 positive samples, sequenced as C suis S45 (2/3) and an endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba species UWE1 (1/3). Chlamydophila pneumoniae TW-183 was detected from exotic frogs kept in a zoo. Of the frogs collected for the prevalence study, 6 of 238 (2.5%) tested positive, 1 each for C suis S45, Cp pneumoniae TW-183, and uncultured Chlamydiales CRG22, and the remaining 3 revealed Chlamydophila abortus S26/3. In immunohistochemistry, there were 2 positive labeling reactions, 1 in intestine and the other in the epithelium coating the body cavity, both testing positive for Cp pneumoniae TW-183 in PCR. Histologically there were no lesions recorded being characteristic for Chlamydia. Although there is a prevalence of Chlamydia in Swiss frogs, no connection to a mass mortality (1991/1992) could be established. For the first time, C suis S45 and Cp abortus S26/3 were detected in frog material.

Abstract

A total of 210 frog samples originating either from a mass mortality (1991/1992) or from routine postmortem investigations of the years 1990 to 2004 were examined retrospectively for a possible involvement of Chlamydiae. For a prevalence study of Chlamydia in a selected Swiss amphibian population, 403 samples from free-ranging Rana temporaria were examined. Histopathology, immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody against chlamydial lipopolysaccharide, and a 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by DNA sequencing were performed on the formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues. Using PCR, 8 of 54 (14.8%) frog samples from the mass mortality (1991/1992) were positive for Chlamydia suis S45. A control group of healthy Xenopus laevis had 3 of 38 positive samples, sequenced as C suis S45 (2/3) and an endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba species UWE1 (1/3). Chlamydophila pneumoniae TW-183 was detected from exotic frogs kept in a zoo. Of the frogs collected for the prevalence study, 6 of 238 (2.5%) tested positive, 1 each for C suis S45, Cp pneumoniae TW-183, and uncultured Chlamydiales CRG22, and the remaining 3 revealed Chlamydophila abortus S26/3. In immunohistochemistry, there were 2 positive labeling reactions, 1 in intestine and the other in the epithelium coating the body cavity, both testing positive for Cp pneumoniae TW-183 in PCR. Histologically there were no lesions recorded being characteristic for Chlamydia. Although there is a prevalence of Chlamydia in Swiss frogs, no connection to a mass mortality (1991/1992) could be established. For the first time, C suis S45 and Cp abortus S26/3 were detected in frog material.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Pathology and Molecular Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2007
Deposited On:24 Jul 2015 10:34
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 13:34
Publisher:Sage Publications Ltd.
ISSN:0300-9858
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1354/vp.44-2-144
PubMed ID:17317791

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