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Exercise intensity modulates capillary perfusion in correspondence with ACE I/D modulated serum angiotensin II levels


van Ginkel, Sander; de Haan, Arnold; Woerdeman, Jorn; Vanhees, Luc; Serné, Erik; de Koning, Jos; Flück, Martin (2015). Exercise intensity modulates capillary perfusion in correspondence with ACE I/D modulated serum angiotensin II levels. Applied and Translational Genomics, 4:33-37.

Abstract

During exercise the renin–angiotensin system is stimulated. We hypothesized that the increase in serum angiotensin II (AngII) levels after exercise is dependent on exercise intensity and duration and secondly that people with the ACE-II genotype will show a higher increase in AngII serum levels. We also assumed that perfusion of upper limbs is transiently reduced with maximal cycling exercise and that subjects with the ACE-II compared to the ACE-ID/DD genotype will have a higher capillary perfusion due to lower AngII levels. Ten healthy subjects completed a maximal exercise test, a 12-min exercise test at ventilatory threshold and a 3-min test at the respiratory compensation point. AngII serum levels and capillary recruitment of the skin in the third finger were measured before and after exercise and breath-by-breath gas exchange during exercise was assessed. Baseline levels of AngII levels were lower prior to the 3-min test which took place on average 5 days after the last exercise. A two-fold increase compared to baseline levels was found for AngII only immediately after the 3-min test and not after the maximal exercise test and 12-min of exercise. Subjects without the I allele showed a decrease in AngII values after the maximal test in contrast to subjects with the ACE-II/ID genotype. Subjects with the ACE-II genotype had a 1.8 times significant higher capillary perfusion in the finger after exercise. A trend was observed for a 34.3% decreased capillary recruitment in the ACE-ID/DD genotype after exercise. We conclude that the rise in AngII after exercise is intensity dependent and that variability in serum AngII and capillary perfusion is related to the ACE I/D polymorphism.

Abstract

During exercise the renin–angiotensin system is stimulated. We hypothesized that the increase in serum angiotensin II (AngII) levels after exercise is dependent on exercise intensity and duration and secondly that people with the ACE-II genotype will show a higher increase in AngII serum levels. We also assumed that perfusion of upper limbs is transiently reduced with maximal cycling exercise and that subjects with the ACE-II compared to the ACE-ID/DD genotype will have a higher capillary perfusion due to lower AngII levels. Ten healthy subjects completed a maximal exercise test, a 12-min exercise test at ventilatory threshold and a 3-min test at the respiratory compensation point. AngII serum levels and capillary recruitment of the skin in the third finger were measured before and after exercise and breath-by-breath gas exchange during exercise was assessed. Baseline levels of AngII levels were lower prior to the 3-min test which took place on average 5 days after the last exercise. A two-fold increase compared to baseline levels was found for AngII only immediately after the 3-min test and not after the maximal exercise test and 12-min of exercise. Subjects without the I allele showed a decrease in AngII values after the maximal test in contrast to subjects with the ACE-II/ID genotype. Subjects with the ACE-II genotype had a 1.8 times significant higher capillary perfusion in the finger after exercise. A trend was observed for a 34.3% decreased capillary recruitment in the ACE-ID/DD genotype after exercise. We conclude that the rise in AngII after exercise is intensity dependent and that variability in serum AngII and capillary perfusion is related to the ACE I/D polymorphism.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:05 Aug 2015 16:12
Last Modified:03 Aug 2017 16:45
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2212-0661
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atg.2015.03.002
PubMed ID:26937347

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