Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Diversity partitioning in Jurassic level-bottom communities


Hautmann, Michael (2016). Diversity partitioning in Jurassic level-bottom communities. Historical biology, 28(6):849-857.

Abstract

The analysis of diversity partitioning is a potential tool for detecting the factors that control taxonomic diversification in a given ecological context. Previously proposed models provide a theoretical framework that is herein applied to three sets of level-bottom communities representing different phases of the Jurassic diversification of marine life. The analysis shows that mean alpha-diversity remained surprisingly constant through most of the Jurassic, whereas beta-diversity increased by a factor of 2.6 during the same time interval. Diversification that is primarily driven by increasing beta-diversity is indicative of late diversification phases in ecosystems with low interspecific competition and/or high predation, as typical for marine level-bottom communities. Although generality of this conclusion is not claimed because of data limitations, the example demonstrates that the study of diversity partitioning provides a promising approach to the basic question about the factors that control the diversification of life.

Abstract

The analysis of diversity partitioning is a potential tool for detecting the factors that control taxonomic diversification in a given ecological context. Previously proposed models provide a theoretical framework that is herein applied to three sets of level-bottom communities representing different phases of the Jurassic diversification of marine life. The analysis shows that mean alpha-diversity remained surprisingly constant through most of the Jurassic, whereas beta-diversity increased by a factor of 2.6 during the same time interval. Diversification that is primarily driven by increasing beta-diversity is indicative of late diversification phases in ecosystems with low interspecific competition and/or high predation, as typical for marine level-bottom communities. Although generality of this conclusion is not claimed because of data limitations, the example demonstrates that the study of diversity partitioning provides a promising approach to the basic question about the factors that control the diversification of life.

Statistics

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

8 downloads since deposited on 06 Aug 2015
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
Dewey Decimal Classification:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:06 Aug 2015 11:51
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 13:40
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0891-2963
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/08912963.2015.1051482

Download