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Local increase of sleep slow wave activity after three weeks of working memory training in children and adolescents


Pugin, Fiona; Metz, Andreas J; Wolf, Martin; Achermann, Peter; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto (2015). Local increase of sleep slow wave activity after three weeks of working memory training in children and adolescents. Sleep, 38(4):607-614.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES Evidence is accumulating that electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep slow wave activity (SWA), the key characteristic of deep sleep, is regulated not only globally, but also locally. Several studies have shown local learning- and use-dependent changes in SWA. In vitro and in vivo animal experiments and studies in humans indicate that these local changes in SWA reflect synaptic plasticity. During maturation, when synaptic changes are most prominent, learning is of utmost importance. Thus, in this study, we aimed to examine whether intensive working memory training for 3 w would lead to a local increase of sleep SWA using high-density EEG recordings in children and young adolescents. SETTING Sleep laboratory at the University Children's Hospital Zurich. PARTICIPANTS Fourteen healthy subjects between 10 and 16 y. INTERVENTIONS Three weeks of intensive working memory training. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS After intensive working memory training, sleep SWA was increased in a small left frontoparietal cluster (11.06 ± 1.24%, mean ± standard error of the mean). In addition, the local increase correlated positively with increased working memory performance assessed immediately (r = 0.66) and 2 to 5 mo (r = 0.68) after the training. CONCLUSIONS The increase in slow wave activity (SWA) correlates with cognitive training-induced plasticity in a region known to be involved in working memory performance. Thus, in future, the mapping of sleep SWA may be used to longitudinally monitor the effects of working memory training in children and adolescents with working memory deficiencies.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES Evidence is accumulating that electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep slow wave activity (SWA), the key characteristic of deep sleep, is regulated not only globally, but also locally. Several studies have shown local learning- and use-dependent changes in SWA. In vitro and in vivo animal experiments and studies in humans indicate that these local changes in SWA reflect synaptic plasticity. During maturation, when synaptic changes are most prominent, learning is of utmost importance. Thus, in this study, we aimed to examine whether intensive working memory training for 3 w would lead to a local increase of sleep SWA using high-density EEG recordings in children and young adolescents. SETTING Sleep laboratory at the University Children's Hospital Zurich. PARTICIPANTS Fourteen healthy subjects between 10 and 16 y. INTERVENTIONS Three weeks of intensive working memory training. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS After intensive working memory training, sleep SWA was increased in a small left frontoparietal cluster (11.06 ± 1.24%, mean ± standard error of the mean). In addition, the local increase correlated positively with increased working memory performance assessed immediately (r = 0.66) and 2 to 5 mo (r = 0.68) after the training. CONCLUSIONS The increase in slow wave activity (SWA) correlates with cognitive training-induced plasticity in a region known to be involved in working memory performance. Thus, in future, the mapping of sleep SWA may be used to longitudinally monitor the effects of working memory training in children and adolescents with working memory deficiencies.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neonatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2015
Deposited On:06 Aug 2015 11:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:20
Publisher:American Academy of Sleep Medicine
ISSN:0161-8105
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.4580
PubMed ID:25669190

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