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Stimulators of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibit experimental skin fibrosis of different aetiologies


Dees, Clara; Beyer, Christian; Distler, Alfiya; Soare, Alina; Zhang, Yun; Palumbo-Zerr, Katrin; Distler, Oliver; Schett, Georg; Sandner, Peter; Distler, Jörg H W (2015). Stimulators of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibit experimental skin fibrosis of different aetiologies. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 74(8):1621-1625.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES Stimulators of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) have recently been shown to inhibit transforming growth factor-β signalling. Here, we aimed to demonstrate that riociguat, the drug candidate for clinical trials in systemic sclerosis (SSc), is effective in experimental fibrosis and to compare its efficacy to that of phosphodiesterase V inhibitors that also increase the intracellular levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. METHODS The antifibrotic effects of riociguat and sildenafil were compared in the tight-skin 1 model, in bleomycin-induced fibrosis and in a model of sclerodermatous chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGvHD). Doses of 0.1-3 mg/kg twice a day for riociguat and of 3-10 mg/kg twice a day for sildenafil were used. RESULT Riociguat dose-dependently reduced skin thickening, myofibroblast differentiation and accumulation of collagen with potent antifibrotic effects at 1 and 3 mg/kg. Riociguat also ameliorated fibrosis of the gastrointestinal tract in the cGvHD model. The antifibrotic effects were associated with reduced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Sildenafil at doses of 3 and 10 mg/kg exerted mild antifibrotic effects that were significantly less pronounced compared with 1 and 3 mg/kg riociguat. CONCLUSIONS These data demonstrated potent antifibrotic effects of riociguat on experimental skin and organ fibrosis. These findings suggest a role for riociguat for the treatment of fibrotic diseases, especially for the treatment of SSc. A phase II study with riociguat in patients with SSc is currently starting.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES Stimulators of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) have recently been shown to inhibit transforming growth factor-β signalling. Here, we aimed to demonstrate that riociguat, the drug candidate for clinical trials in systemic sclerosis (SSc), is effective in experimental fibrosis and to compare its efficacy to that of phosphodiesterase V inhibitors that also increase the intracellular levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate. METHODS The antifibrotic effects of riociguat and sildenafil were compared in the tight-skin 1 model, in bleomycin-induced fibrosis and in a model of sclerodermatous chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGvHD). Doses of 0.1-3 mg/kg twice a day for riociguat and of 3-10 mg/kg twice a day for sildenafil were used. RESULT Riociguat dose-dependently reduced skin thickening, myofibroblast differentiation and accumulation of collagen with potent antifibrotic effects at 1 and 3 mg/kg. Riociguat also ameliorated fibrosis of the gastrointestinal tract in the cGvHD model. The antifibrotic effects were associated with reduced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Sildenafil at doses of 3 and 10 mg/kg exerted mild antifibrotic effects that were significantly less pronounced compared with 1 and 3 mg/kg riociguat. CONCLUSIONS These data demonstrated potent antifibrotic effects of riociguat on experimental skin and organ fibrosis. These findings suggest a role for riociguat for the treatment of fibrotic diseases, especially for the treatment of SSc. A phase II study with riociguat in patients with SSc is currently starting.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:August 2015
Deposited On:06 Aug 2015 12:49
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:20
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0003-4967
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-206809
PubMed ID:25817717

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