Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Protein adsorption steers blood contact activation on engineered cobalt chromium alloy oxide layers


Milleret, Vincent; Buzzi, Stefano; Gehrig, Peter; Ziogas, Algirdas; Grossmann, Jonas; Schilcher, Katrin; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Zucker, Arik; Ehrbar, Martin (2015). Protein adsorption steers blood contact activation on engineered cobalt chromium alloy oxide layers. Acta Biomaterialia, 24:343-351.

Abstract

Biomaterials upon implantation are immediately covered by blood proteins which direct the subsequent blood activation. These early events determine the following cascade of biological reactions and consequently the long-term success of implants. The ability to modulate surface properties of biomaterials is therefore of considerable clinical significance. Goal of this study was an in-depth understanding of the biological response to cobalt chromium stent alloys with engineered surface oxide layers, which showed altered body reactions in vivo. We analyzed in vitro the biological events following initial blood contact on engineered cobalt chromium surfaces featuring said oxide layers. Surface-specific blood reactions were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and the adsorbed protein layers were characterized by mass spectrometry. This powerful proteomics tool allowed the identification and quantification of over hundred surface-adhering proteins. Proteins associated with the coagulation cascade, platelet adhesion and neutrophil function correlated with the various blood surface activations observed. Furthermore, results of pre-coated surfaces with defined fibrinogen-albumin mixtures suggest that neutrophil adhesion was controlled by fibrinogen orientation and conformation rather than quantity. This study highlights the importance of controlling the biological response in the complex protein-implant surface interactions and the potential of the surface modifications to improve the clinical performance of medical implants.
STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE
The blood contact activation of CoCr alloys is determined by their surface oxide layer properties. Modifications of the oxide layer affected the total amount of adsorbed proteins and the composition of the adsorbed protein layer. Additionally fibrinogen coatings mediated the surface-dependent neutrophil adhesion in a concentration-independent manner, indicating the influence of conformation and/or orientation of the adsorbed protein. Despite the complexity of protein-implant interactions, this study highlights the importance of understanding and controlling mechanisms of protein adhesion in order to improve and steer the performance of medical implants. It shows that modification of the surface oxide layer is a very attractive strategy to directly functionalize metallic implant surfaces and optimize their blood interaction for the desired orthopedic or cardiovascular applications.

Abstract

Biomaterials upon implantation are immediately covered by blood proteins which direct the subsequent blood activation. These early events determine the following cascade of biological reactions and consequently the long-term success of implants. The ability to modulate surface properties of biomaterials is therefore of considerable clinical significance. Goal of this study was an in-depth understanding of the biological response to cobalt chromium stent alloys with engineered surface oxide layers, which showed altered body reactions in vivo. We analyzed in vitro the biological events following initial blood contact on engineered cobalt chromium surfaces featuring said oxide layers. Surface-specific blood reactions were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and the adsorbed protein layers were characterized by mass spectrometry. This powerful proteomics tool allowed the identification and quantification of over hundred surface-adhering proteins. Proteins associated with the coagulation cascade, platelet adhesion and neutrophil function correlated with the various blood surface activations observed. Furthermore, results of pre-coated surfaces with defined fibrinogen-albumin mixtures suggest that neutrophil adhesion was controlled by fibrinogen orientation and conformation rather than quantity. This study highlights the importance of controlling the biological response in the complex protein-implant surface interactions and the potential of the surface modifications to improve the clinical performance of medical implants.
STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE
The blood contact activation of CoCr alloys is determined by their surface oxide layer properties. Modifications of the oxide layer affected the total amount of adsorbed proteins and the composition of the adsorbed protein layer. Additionally fibrinogen coatings mediated the surface-dependent neutrophil adhesion in a concentration-independent manner, indicating the influence of conformation and/or orientation of the adsorbed protein. Despite the complexity of protein-implant interactions, this study highlights the importance of understanding and controlling mechanisms of protein adhesion in order to improve and steer the performance of medical implants. It shows that modification of the surface oxide layer is a very attractive strategy to directly functionalize metallic implant surfaces and optimize their blood interaction for the desired orthopedic or cardiovascular applications.

Statistics

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 06 Aug 2015
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Obstetrics
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:20 June 2015
Deposited On:06 Aug 2015 11:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:20
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1742-7061
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2015.06.020
PubMed ID:26102336

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations