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On the Modulation of Brain Activation During Simulated Weight Bearing in Supine Gait-Like Stepping


Jaeger, Lukas; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Wolf, Peter; Luft, Andreas R; Riener, Robert; Michels, Lars; Kollias, Spyros (2016). On the Modulation of Brain Activation During Simulated Weight Bearing in Supine Gait-Like Stepping. Brain Topography, 29(1):193-205.

Abstract

To date, the neurophysiological correlates of muscle activation required for weight bearing during walking are poorly understood although, a supraspinal involvement has been discussed in the literature for many years. The present study investigates the effect of simulated ground reaction forces (0, 20, and 40 % of individual body weight) on brain activation in sixteen healthy participants. A magnetic resonance compatible robot was applied to render three different levels of load against the feet of the participants during active and passive gait-like stepping movements. Brain activation was analyzed by the means of voxel-wise whole brain analysis as well as by a region-of-interest analysis. A significant modulation of brain activation in sensorimotor areas by the load level could neither be demonstrated during active nor during passive stepping. These observations suggest that the regulation of muscle activation under different weight-bearing conditions during stepping occurs at the level of spinal circuitry or the brainstem rather than at the supraspinal level.

Abstract

To date, the neurophysiological correlates of muscle activation required for weight bearing during walking are poorly understood although, a supraspinal involvement has been discussed in the literature for many years. The present study investigates the effect of simulated ground reaction forces (0, 20, and 40 % of individual body weight) on brain activation in sixteen healthy participants. A magnetic resonance compatible robot was applied to render three different levels of load against the feet of the participants during active and passive gait-like stepping movements. Brain activation was analyzed by the means of voxel-wise whole brain analysis as well as by a region-of-interest analysis. A significant modulation of brain activation in sensorimotor areas by the load level could neither be demonstrated during active nor during passive stepping. These observations suggest that the regulation of muscle activation under different weight-bearing conditions during stepping occurs at the level of spinal circuitry or the brainstem rather than at the supraspinal level.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neuroradiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:13 Aug 2015 06:05
Last Modified:28 Aug 2017 15:55
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0896-0267
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10548-015-0441-7
PubMed ID:26206204

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