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Seeding with omental cells prevents late neointimal hyperplasia in small-diameter Dacron grafts.


Pasic, Miralem; Müller-Glauser, Werner; Odermatt, Bernhard; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Turina, Marko (1995). Seeding with omental cells prevents late neointimal hyperplasia in small-diameter Dacron grafts. Circulation, 92(9):2605-16.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The influence of complete endothelialization of a prosthetic graft on development of late neointimal hyperplasia is unknown. This study was designed to investigate the effect of complete coverage with endothelial-like cells on late neointimal hyperplasia in small-diameter Dacron grafts seeded with omental cells in a canine model. METHODS AND RESULTS Four-mm-ID Dacron grafts were seeded with cells from omentum and implanted in the carotid arteries in 24 mongrel dogs. Each dog received one seeded and one nonseeded graft. The graft patencies were assessed by angiography at 1, 5, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after surgery. The prostheses were explanted at 5, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after surgery and underwent microscopic studies. The actuarial patency rates at 1, 5, 12, 26, and 52 weeks were 100%, 95%, 95%, 95% and 95% for seeded grafts and 100%, 86%, 49%, 40%, and 13% for nonseeded grafts, respectively. The seeded grafts exhibited a uniform endothelial-like luminal monolayer without the development of late neointimal proliferation or anastomotic neointimal hyperplasia. Neointimal tissue thickness increased up to 6 months; no additional progression of the subendothelial tissue thickness was observed, in fact there was an insignificant decrease. CONCLUSIONS Seeding with omental cells prevents development of late neointimal hyperplasia of small diameter prosthetic vascular grafts in a canine model.

Abstract

BACKGROUND The influence of complete endothelialization of a prosthetic graft on development of late neointimal hyperplasia is unknown. This study was designed to investigate the effect of complete coverage with endothelial-like cells on late neointimal hyperplasia in small-diameter Dacron grafts seeded with omental cells in a canine model. METHODS AND RESULTS Four-mm-ID Dacron grafts were seeded with cells from omentum and implanted in the carotid arteries in 24 mongrel dogs. Each dog received one seeded and one nonseeded graft. The graft patencies were assessed by angiography at 1, 5, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after surgery. The prostheses were explanted at 5, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after surgery and underwent microscopic studies. The actuarial patency rates at 1, 5, 12, 26, and 52 weeks were 100%, 95%, 95%, 95% and 95% for seeded grafts and 100%, 86%, 49%, 40%, and 13% for nonseeded grafts, respectively. The seeded grafts exhibited a uniform endothelial-like luminal monolayer without the development of late neointimal proliferation or anastomotic neointimal hyperplasia. Neointimal tissue thickness increased up to 6 months; no additional progression of the subendothelial tissue thickness was observed, in fact there was an insignificant decrease. CONCLUSIONS Seeding with omental cells prevents development of late neointimal hyperplasia of small diameter prosthetic vascular grafts in a canine model.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 November 1995
Deposited On:19 Aug 2015 12:42
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:21
Publisher:American Heart Association
ISSN:0009-7322
PubMed ID:7586363

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