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Amylin: Pharmacology, Physiology, and Clinical Potential


Hay, Debbie L; Chen, Steve; Lutz, Thomas A; Parkes, David G; Roth, Jonathan D (2015). Amylin: Pharmacology, Physiology, and Clinical Potential. Pharmacological Reviews, 67(3):564-600.

Abstract

Amylin is a pancreatic β-cell hormone that produces effects in several different organ systems. Here, we review the literature in rodents and in humans on amylin research since its discovery as a hormone about 25 years ago. Amylin is a 37-amino-acid peptide that activates its specific receptors, which are multisubunit G protein-coupled receptors resulting from the coexpression of a core receptor protein with receptor activity-modifying proteins, resulting in multiple receptor subtypes. Amylin's major role is as a glucoregulatory hormone, and it is an important regulator of energy metabolism in health and disease. Other amylin actions have also been reported, such as on the cardiovascular system or on bone. Amylin acts principally in the circumventricular organs of the central nervous system and functionally interacts with other metabolically active hormones such as cholecystokinin, leptin, and estradiol. The amylin-based peptide, pramlintide, is used clinically to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies in obesity have shown that amylin agonists could also be useful for weight loss, especially in combination with other agents.

Abstract

Amylin is a pancreatic β-cell hormone that produces effects in several different organ systems. Here, we review the literature in rodents and in humans on amylin research since its discovery as a hormone about 25 years ago. Amylin is a 37-amino-acid peptide that activates its specific receptors, which are multisubunit G protein-coupled receptors resulting from the coexpression of a core receptor protein with receptor activity-modifying proteins, resulting in multiple receptor subtypes. Amylin's major role is as a glucoregulatory hormone, and it is an important regulator of energy metabolism in health and disease. Other amylin actions have also been reported, such as on the cardiovascular system or on bone. Amylin acts principally in the circumventricular organs of the central nervous system and functionally interacts with other metabolically active hormones such as cholecystokinin, leptin, and estradiol. The amylin-based peptide, pramlintide, is used clinically to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Clinical studies in obesity have shown that amylin agonists could also be useful for weight loss, especially in combination with other agents.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Laboratory Animal Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:03 Sep 2015 12:25
Last Modified:21 Nov 2017 18:00
Publisher:American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
ISSN:0031-6997
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1124/pr.115.010629
PubMed ID:26071095

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