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Intermediality and Performance Art


Ljungberg, Christina (2015). Intermediality and Performance Art. In: Rippl, Gabriele. Handbook of Intermediality. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter Mouton, 547-561.

Abstract

Intermedial interaction among various media or sign systems has always existed in most cultures, but since performance art is a relatively new phenomenon,this chapter focuses on the relationship between intermediality and performance art. With the increasingly frequent use of sophisticated digital technologies in multimedia performance, the question regarding what happens when several media interact in performance art has become a pressing one. What is the relationship between intermediality, performance and performativity in multimedia art forms? How does the sense of openness and of unravelling of the source or pre-text translate into the intermedial adaptation that a performance involves? This chapter discusses issues of semiotics, performativity and self-reference in relation to intermediality. For its application of these theoretical concerns, it will use Laurie Anderson, the American performance artist, whose large and complex multimedia productions have not only revolutionised the art form, but also offer interesting insights into the adaptation of the intersection of narrative, visual, musical and gestural source texts mediated by new technologies and the performing arts. In particular, Anderson’s performance “O Superman” from her groundbreaking performance United States (1980) will allow us to discuss the close relationship between intermediality and performance art. Key Terms: Intermediality, performance art, performativity, self-reference, self-reflexivity,multimedia, Laurie Anderson

Abstract

Intermedial interaction among various media or sign systems has always existed in most cultures, but since performance art is a relatively new phenomenon,this chapter focuses on the relationship between intermediality and performance art. With the increasingly frequent use of sophisticated digital technologies in multimedia performance, the question regarding what happens when several media interact in performance art has become a pressing one. What is the relationship between intermediality, performance and performativity in multimedia art forms? How does the sense of openness and of unravelling of the source or pre-text translate into the intermedial adaptation that a performance involves? This chapter discusses issues of semiotics, performativity and self-reference in relation to intermediality. For its application of these theoretical concerns, it will use Laurie Anderson, the American performance artist, whose large and complex multimedia productions have not only revolutionised the art form, but also offer interesting insights into the adaptation of the intersection of narrative, visual, musical and gestural source texts mediated by new technologies and the performing arts. In particular, Anderson’s performance “O Superman” from her groundbreaking performance United States (1980) will allow us to discuss the close relationship between intermediality and performance art. Key Terms: Intermediality, performance art, performativity, self-reference, self-reflexivity,multimedia, Laurie Anderson

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > English Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:820 English & Old English literatures
Uncontrolled Keywords:Intermediality, performance art, performativity, self-reference, self-reflexivity,multimedia, Laurie Anderson
Language:English
Date:June 2015
Deposited On:03 Sep 2015 13:21
Last Modified:08 May 2016 14:12
Publisher:De Gruyter Mouton
ISBN:978-3-11-030836-5
Related URLs:http://www.degruyter.com/view/product/204852?rskey=Bp3h3w&result=1 (Publisher)

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