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Sperm competition selects beyond relative testes size in birds


Lüpold, S; Linz, G M; Rivers, J W; Westneat, D F; Birkhead, T R (2009). Sperm competition selects beyond relative testes size in birds. Evolution, 63(2):391-402.

Abstract

Sperm morphology varies considerably across taxa, and postcopulatory sexual selection is thought to be one of the main forces responsible for this diversity. Several studies have investigated the effects of the variation in sperm design on sperm function, but the consequences of variation in sperm design on testis morphology have been overlooked. Testes size or architecture may determine the size of the sperm they produce, and selection for longer sperm may require concomitant adaptations in the testes. Relative testes size differs greatly between species and is often used as an index of sperm competition, but little is known about whether larger testes have more sperm-producing tissue or produce sperm at a faster rate. Using a comparative approach in New World Blackbirds (Icteridae), we found (1) a strong link between testis histology and sperm length, suggesting selection on testis architecture through selection on sperm size, and (2) that species under intense sperm competition had a greater proportion of sperm-producing tissue within their testes. These results support the prediction that sperm competition fosters adaptations in reproductive organs that extend beyond testes size, and raise questions about the trade-offs influencing reproductive investment.

Abstract

Sperm morphology varies considerably across taxa, and postcopulatory sexual selection is thought to be one of the main forces responsible for this diversity. Several studies have investigated the effects of the variation in sperm design on sperm function, but the consequences of variation in sperm design on testis morphology have been overlooked. Testes size or architecture may determine the size of the sperm they produce, and selection for longer sperm may require concomitant adaptations in the testes. Relative testes size differs greatly between species and is often used as an index of sperm competition, but little is known about whether larger testes have more sperm-producing tissue or produce sperm at a faster rate. Using a comparative approach in New World Blackbirds (Icteridae), we found (1) a strong link between testis histology and sperm length, suggesting selection on testis architecture through selection on sperm size, and (2) that species under intense sperm competition had a greater proportion of sperm-producing tissue within their testes. These results support the prediction that sperm competition fosters adaptations in reproductive organs that extend beyond testes size, and raise questions about the trade-offs influencing reproductive investment.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Icteridae, New World Blackbirds, seminiferous tissue, sperm competition, sperm size, testis architecture
Language:English
Date:February 2009
Deposited On:28 Oct 2015 13:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:27
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0014-3820
Funders:Swiss National Science Foundation, Janggen-Poehn Foundation, Leverhulme Trust, Sheffield University ORS Award
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2008.00571.x
PubMed ID:19215291

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