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They produce the sperm, but whose is it?: The 11 Biology of Spermatozoa Meeting September 5-9, 2011-Derbyshire UK


Lüpold, Stefan (2011). They produce the sperm, but whose is it?: The 11 Biology of Spermatozoa Meeting September 5-9, 2011-Derbyshire UK. Spermatogenesis, 1(4):339-340.

Abstract

Sperm biology pervades numerous research areas from clinical research to evolutionary biology and animal conservation. Integrating these fields for a better understanding of each is one of the main goals of the Biology of Spermatozoa meeting, a conference held biennially outside of Sheffield in the United Kingdom. This September, at the 11th meeting, scientists from around the globe presented their ongoing research on numerous aspects of reproductive biology, from assisted reproduction in humans and animal conservation through stem cell research and proteomics to sophisticated evolutionary adaptations of ejaculates and female reproductive traits in order to bias paternity toward one or the other male in situations of female promiscuity. Throughout the conference, ethical controversies with reproductive applications (e.g., sperm banking) found their place just as much as novel clinical technologies (e.g., sperm quality assays) or major advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying fundamental processes of postcopulatory sexual selection (e.g., using transgenic animals that produce fluorescently labeled sperm). Across a wide range of different taxa, this meeting has presented a fascinating synthesis of current research and emerging directions in the study of sperm biology.

Abstract

Sperm biology pervades numerous research areas from clinical research to evolutionary biology and animal conservation. Integrating these fields for a better understanding of each is one of the main goals of the Biology of Spermatozoa meeting, a conference held biennially outside of Sheffield in the United Kingdom. This September, at the 11th meeting, scientists from around the globe presented their ongoing research on numerous aspects of reproductive biology, from assisted reproduction in humans and animal conservation through stem cell research and proteomics to sophisticated evolutionary adaptations of ejaculates and female reproductive traits in order to bias paternity toward one or the other male in situations of female promiscuity. Throughout the conference, ethical controversies with reproductive applications (e.g., sperm banking) found their place just as much as novel clinical technologies (e.g., sperm quality assays) or major advances in understanding the mechanisms underlying fundamental processes of postcopulatory sexual selection (e.g., using transgenic animals that produce fluorescently labeled sperm). Across a wide range of different taxa, this meeting has presented a fascinating synthesis of current research and emerging directions in the study of sperm biology.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:October 2011
Deposited On:28 Oct 2015 13:41
Last Modified:21 Nov 2017 18:03
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:2156-5554
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4161/spmg.1.4.18327
PubMed ID:22332117

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