Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Advances in bone augmentation to enable dental implant placement: Consensus Report of the Sixth European Workshop on Periodontology


Tonetti, M S; Hämmerle, C H F (2008). Advances in bone augmentation to enable dental implant placement: Consensus Report of the Sixth European Workshop on Periodontology. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 35 (8 Supp):168-172.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Bone augmentation procedures to enable dental implant placement are frequently performed in practice. METHODS: In this session the European Workshop on Periodontology discussed the evidence in support of the procedures and examined both adverse events and implant performance in the augmented bone. While the available evidence improved both in quantity and quality since previous workshops the conclusions that could be drawn were limited by elements of design and/or reporting that are amenable to improvement. RESULTS: With regards to lateral bone augmentation, a sizable body of evidence supports its use to enable dental implant placement. The group recognized the potential for vertical ridge augmentation procedures to allow implant placement in clinical practice but questioned the applicability of these data to a wider array of operators and clinical settings. With regards to sinus floor augmentation, perforation of the sinus membrane, graft infection and graft loss resulting in inability of implant placement were the major reported adverse events. In cases with <6 mm of residual bone height, 17% of subjects experienced implant loss in the first 3 years following lateral window augmentation. After trans-alveolar sinus floor augmentation 11% of subjects experienced implant loss over 3 years. Significant research activity (both pre-clinical and clinical) was identified in the area of growth factors-induced bone augmentation. Initial clinical trials support the potential of BMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: Clinically, the consensus highlighted that bone augmentation procedures can fail and that implants placed in these areas do not necessarily enjoy the high long-term survival rates of dental implants placed in pristine sites. The consensus emphasized the research need to answer questions on: (i) long-term performance of dental implants placed in augmented bone; (ii) the clinical performance of dental implants placed in augmented or pristine sites; and (iii) the clinical benefits of bone augmentation with respect to alternative treatments.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Bone augmentation procedures to enable dental implant placement are frequently performed in practice. METHODS: In this session the European Workshop on Periodontology discussed the evidence in support of the procedures and examined both adverse events and implant performance in the augmented bone. While the available evidence improved both in quantity and quality since previous workshops the conclusions that could be drawn were limited by elements of design and/or reporting that are amenable to improvement. RESULTS: With regards to lateral bone augmentation, a sizable body of evidence supports its use to enable dental implant placement. The group recognized the potential for vertical ridge augmentation procedures to allow implant placement in clinical practice but questioned the applicability of these data to a wider array of operators and clinical settings. With regards to sinus floor augmentation, perforation of the sinus membrane, graft infection and graft loss resulting in inability of implant placement were the major reported adverse events. In cases with <6 mm of residual bone height, 17% of subjects experienced implant loss in the first 3 years following lateral window augmentation. After trans-alveolar sinus floor augmentation 11% of subjects experienced implant loss over 3 years. Significant research activity (both pre-clinical and clinical) was identified in the area of growth factors-induced bone augmentation. Initial clinical trials support the potential of BMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: Clinically, the consensus highlighted that bone augmentation procedures can fail and that implants placed in these areas do not necessarily enjoy the high long-term survival rates of dental implants placed in pristine sites. The consensus emphasized the research need to answer questions on: (i) long-term performance of dental implants placed in augmented bone; (ii) the clinical performance of dental implants placed in augmented or pristine sites; and (iii) the clinical benefits of bone augmentation with respect to alternative treatments.

Statistics

Citations

88 citations in Web of Science®
85 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

99 downloads since deposited on 23 Jan 2009
32 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Contributors:European Workshop on Periodontology Group C
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:September 2008
Deposited On:23 Jan 2009 13:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:53
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0303-6979
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051X.2008.01268.x
PubMed ID:18724849

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher
Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations