Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Uptake of ferromagnetic carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles in endothelial cells: influence of shear stress and endothelial activation


Jacobson, Melanie; Roth Z'graggen, Birgit; Graber, Sereina M; Schumacher, Christoph M; Stark, Wendelin J; Dumrese, Claudia; Mateos, Jose Maria; Aemisegger, Caroline; Ziegler, Urs; Urner, Martin; Herrmann, Inge K; Beck-Schimmer, Beatrice (2015). Uptake of ferromagnetic carbon-encapsulated metal nanoparticles in endothelial cells: influence of shear stress and endothelial activation. Nanomedicine, 10(24):3537-3546.

Abstract

AIM Magnetic field guided drug targeting holds promise for more effective cancer treatment. Intravascular application of magnetic nanoparticles, however, bears the risk of potentially important, yet poorly understood side effects, such as off-target accumulation in endothelial cells. MATERIALS & METHODS Here, we investigated the influence of shear stress (0-3.22 dyn/cm(2)), exposure time (5-30 min) and endothelial activation on the uptake of ferromagnetic carbon-encapsulated iron carbide nanomagnets into endothelial cells in an in vitro flow cell model. RESULTS We found that even moderate shear stresses typically encountered in the venous system strongly reduce particle uptake compared with static conditions. Interestingly, a pronounced particle uptake was observed in inflamed endothelial cells. CONCLUSION This study highlights the importance of relevant exposure scenarios accounting for physiological conditions when studying particle-cell interactions as, for example, shear stress and endothelial activation are major determinants of particle uptake. Such considerations are of particular importance with regard to successful translation of in vitro findings into (pre-)clinical end points.

Abstract

AIM Magnetic field guided drug targeting holds promise for more effective cancer treatment. Intravascular application of magnetic nanoparticles, however, bears the risk of potentially important, yet poorly understood side effects, such as off-target accumulation in endothelial cells. MATERIALS & METHODS Here, we investigated the influence of shear stress (0-3.22 dyn/cm(2)), exposure time (5-30 min) and endothelial activation on the uptake of ferromagnetic carbon-encapsulated iron carbide nanomagnets into endothelial cells in an in vitro flow cell model. RESULTS We found that even moderate shear stresses typically encountered in the venous system strongly reduce particle uptake compared with static conditions. Interestingly, a pronounced particle uptake was observed in inflamed endothelial cells. CONCLUSION This study highlights the importance of relevant exposure scenarios accounting for physiological conditions when studying particle-cell interactions as, for example, shear stress and endothelial activation are major determinants of particle uptake. Such considerations are of particular importance with regard to successful translation of in vitro findings into (pre-)clinical end points.

Statistics

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Microscopy and Image Analysis
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Anthropology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:5 October 2015
Deposited On:29 Oct 2015 07:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:27
Publisher:Future Medicine
ISSN:1743-5889
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2217/nnm.15.172
PubMed ID:26434758

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher