Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Effect of organic zinc sources on performance, zinc status and carcass, meat and claw quality in fattening bulls


Kessler, J; Morel, I; Dufey, P-A; Gutzwiller, A; Stern, A; Geyer, H (2003). Effect of organic zinc sources on performance, zinc status and carcass, meat and claw quality in fattening bulls. Livestock Production Science, 81(2-3):161-171.

Abstract

A total of 4×15 growing Red Holstein crossbreeding bulls were used to assess the effect of two organic zinc sources, i.e. Zn proteinate and Zn polysaccharide, compared with Zn oxide and a control treatment without Zn supplementation on feed intake, growth rate, zinc status as well as carcass, M. longissimus thoracis and claw quality. The chosen zinc level of 45 mg/kg DM corresponded to recommended requirements (RAP, 1999). The feeding trial lasted for 284 days and comprised the weight range (average) 146–520 kg live weight. The ration consisted of maize and grass silage supplemented with concentrate and a mineral–vitamin mix. The chemical form of added Zn sources had no significant effect on the average dry matter intake, growth rate or feed conversion ratio. Dietary treatment influenced neither zinc status nor carcass and meat quality in a statistical way. In comparison to inorganic Zn, feeding organic Zn compounds to bulls resulted in some improvement in claw quality.

Abstract

A total of 4×15 growing Red Holstein crossbreeding bulls were used to assess the effect of two organic zinc sources, i.e. Zn proteinate and Zn polysaccharide, compared with Zn oxide and a control treatment without Zn supplementation on feed intake, growth rate, zinc status as well as carcass, M. longissimus thoracis and claw quality. The chosen zinc level of 45 mg/kg DM corresponded to recommended requirements (RAP, 1999). The feeding trial lasted for 284 days and comprised the weight range (average) 146–520 kg live weight. The ration consisted of maize and grass silage supplemented with concentrate and a mineral–vitamin mix. The chemical form of added Zn sources had no significant effect on the average dry matter intake, growth rate or feed conversion ratio. Dietary treatment influenced neither zinc status nor carcass and meat quality in a statistical way. In comparison to inorganic Zn, feeding organic Zn compounds to bulls resulted in some improvement in claw quality.

Statistics

Citations

22 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 20 Oct 2015
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2003
Deposited On:20 Oct 2015 11:38
Last Modified:23 Nov 2017 04:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0301-6226
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S0301-6226(02)00262-2

Download