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How much is too much? Threshold dose distributions for 5 food allergens - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; et al (2015). How much is too much? Threshold dose distributions for 5 food allergens. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 135(4):964-971.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Precautionary labeling is used to warn consumers of the presence of unintended allergens, but the lack of agreed allergen thresholds can result in confusion and risk taking by patients with food allergy. The lack of data on threshold doses below which subjects are unlikely to react is preventing the development of evidence-based allergen management strategies that are understood by clinician and patient alike. OBJECTIVE We sought to define threshold dose distributions for 5 major allergenic foods in the European population. METHODS Patients with food allergy were drawn from the EuroPrevall birth cohort, community surveys, and outpatient clinic studies and invited to undergo a food challenge. Low-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges were undertaken with commercially available food ingredients (peanut, hazelnut, celery, fish, and shrimp) blinded into common matrices. Dose distributions were modeled by using interval-censoring survival analysis with 3 parametric approaches. RESULTS Of the 5 foods used for challenge, 4 produced similar dose distributions, with estimated doses eliciting reactions in 10% of the allergic population (ED10), ranging from 1.6 to 10.1 mg of protein for hazelnut, peanut, and celery with overlapping 95% CIs. ED10 values for fish were somewhat higher (27.3 mg of protein), although the CIs were wide and overlapping between fish and plant foods. Shrimp provided radically different dose distributions, with an ED10 value of 2.5 g of protein. CONCLUSION This evidence base will contribute to the development of reference doses and action levels for allergens in foods below which only the most sensitive subjects might react.

Abstract

BACKGROUND Precautionary labeling is used to warn consumers of the presence of unintended allergens, but the lack of agreed allergen thresholds can result in confusion and risk taking by patients with food allergy. The lack of data on threshold doses below which subjects are unlikely to react is preventing the development of evidence-based allergen management strategies that are understood by clinician and patient alike. OBJECTIVE We sought to define threshold dose distributions for 5 major allergenic foods in the European population. METHODS Patients with food allergy were drawn from the EuroPrevall birth cohort, community surveys, and outpatient clinic studies and invited to undergo a food challenge. Low-dose, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges were undertaken with commercially available food ingredients (peanut, hazelnut, celery, fish, and shrimp) blinded into common matrices. Dose distributions were modeled by using interval-censoring survival analysis with 3 parametric approaches. RESULTS Of the 5 foods used for challenge, 4 produced similar dose distributions, with estimated doses eliciting reactions in 10% of the allergic population (ED10), ranging from 1.6 to 10.1 mg of protein for hazelnut, peanut, and celery with overlapping 95% CIs. ED10 values for fish were somewhat higher (27.3 mg of protein), although the CIs were wide and overlapping between fish and plant foods. Shrimp provided radically different dose distributions, with an ED10 value of 2.5 g of protein. CONCLUSION This evidence base will contribute to the development of reference doses and action levels for allergens in foods below which only the most sensitive subjects might react.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:April 2015
Deposited On:04 Nov 2015 15:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:28
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0091-6749
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2014.10.047
PubMed ID:25589011

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