Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Whole-Body Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Feasibility Study


Kenkel, David; von Spiczak, Jochen; Wurnig, Moritz C; Filli, Lukas; Steidle, Günter; Wyss, Michael; Boss, Andreas (2016). Whole-Body Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Feasibility Study. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, 40(1):183-188.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-body diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as a promising tool for research applications, for instance, for investigation of systemic muscle diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twelve healthy volunteers (mean age, 26.6 years; range, 20-39 years) underwent whole-body magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T using an echo planar imaging sequence (b value, 400 s/mm) with 6 different spatial encoding directions. Coronal maps of DTI parameters including mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, and diffusion tensor eigenvalues (λ1-3) were generated using in-house MATLAB routines. Diffusion tensor imaging parameters were evaluated by region-of-interest analysis in skeletal muscle, cerebral gray and white matter, the kidneys, and the liver. RESULTS The acquisition time was 79 minutes 12 seconds. The different organs could be clearly depicted on the parametrical maps. Exemplary values in skeletal muscle were mean diffusivity, 1.67 ± 0.16 × 10 mm/s; fractional anisotropy, 0.26 ± 0.03; λ1, 2.17 ± 0.20 × 10 mm/s; λ2, 1.64 ± 0.17 × 10 mm/s; and λ3, 1.22 ± 0.12 × 10 mm/s. CONCLUSION Whole-body DTI is technically feasible. Further refinements are required to achieve a higher signal-to-noise ratio and improved spatial resolution. A possible clinical application could be the assessment of systemic myopathies.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of whole-body diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) as a promising tool for research applications, for instance, for investigation of systemic muscle diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twelve healthy volunteers (mean age, 26.6 years; range, 20-39 years) underwent whole-body magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T using an echo planar imaging sequence (b value, 400 s/mm) with 6 different spatial encoding directions. Coronal maps of DTI parameters including mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, and diffusion tensor eigenvalues (λ1-3) were generated using in-house MATLAB routines. Diffusion tensor imaging parameters were evaluated by region-of-interest analysis in skeletal muscle, cerebral gray and white matter, the kidneys, and the liver. RESULTS The acquisition time was 79 minutes 12 seconds. The different organs could be clearly depicted on the parametrical maps. Exemplary values in skeletal muscle were mean diffusivity, 1.67 ± 0.16 × 10 mm/s; fractional anisotropy, 0.26 ± 0.03; λ1, 2.17 ± 0.20 × 10 mm/s; λ2, 1.64 ± 0.17 × 10 mm/s; and λ3, 1.22 ± 0.12 × 10 mm/s. CONCLUSION Whole-body DTI is technically feasible. Further refinements are required to achieve a higher signal-to-noise ratio and improved spatial resolution. A possible clinical application could be the assessment of systemic myopathies.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 12 Nov 2015
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2016
Deposited On:12 Nov 2015 13:46
Last Modified:13 Oct 2016 00:00
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0363-8715
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/RCT.0000000000000324
PubMed ID:26466110

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 198kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations