Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Mapping the field of Algorithmic Journalism


Dörr, Konstantin (2016). Mapping the field of Algorithmic Journalism. Digital Journalism, 4(6):700-722.

Abstract

With software automatically producing texts in natural language from structured data, the evolution of natural language generation (NLG) is changing traditional news production. The paper first addresses the question whether NLG is able to perform the functions of professional journalism on a technical level. A technological potential analysis therefore uncovers the technological limitations and possibilities of NLG, accompanied by an institutional classification following Weischenberg, Malik, and Scholl. Overall, NLG is explained within the framework of algorithmic selection and along its technological functionality. The second part of the paper focuses on the economic potential of NLG in journalism as well as indicating its institutionalization on an organizational level. Thirteen semi-structured interviews with representatives of the most relevant service providers detail the current market situation. Following Heuss, the development of the NLG market is classified into phases. In summary, although the market for NLG in journalism is still at an early stage of market expansion, with only a few providers and journalistic products available, NLG is able to perform tasks of professional journalism at a technical level. The analysis therefore sets the basis to analyze upcoming challenges for journalism research at the intersection of technology and big data.

Abstract

With software automatically producing texts in natural language from structured data, the evolution of natural language generation (NLG) is changing traditional news production. The paper first addresses the question whether NLG is able to perform the functions of professional journalism on a technical level. A technological potential analysis therefore uncovers the technological limitations and possibilities of NLG, accompanied by an institutional classification following Weischenberg, Malik, and Scholl. Overall, NLG is explained within the framework of algorithmic selection and along its technological functionality. The second part of the paper focuses on the economic potential of NLG in journalism as well as indicating its institutionalization on an organizational level. Thirteen semi-structured interviews with representatives of the most relevant service providers detail the current market situation. Following Heuss, the development of the NLG market is classified into phases. In summary, although the market for NLG in journalism is still at an early stage of market expansion, with only a few providers and journalistic products available, NLG is able to perform tasks of professional journalism at a technical level. The analysis therefore sets the basis to analyze upcoming challenges for journalism research at the intersection of technology and big data.

Statistics

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
6 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

188 downloads since deposited on 13 Nov 2015
178 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Mass Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:700 Arts
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:13 Nov 2015 11:41
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 14:44
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:2167-0811
Additional Information:This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Digital Journalism on 2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI: 10.1080/21670811.2015.1096748].
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/21670811.2015.1096748

Download

Download PDF  'Mapping the field of Algorithmic Journalism'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 940kB
View at publisher