Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Unbiased metagenomic sequencing complements specific routine diagnostic methods and increases chances to detect rare viral strains


Lewandowska, Dagmara W; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Zbinden, Andrea; Schuurmans, Macé M; Schreiber, Peter; Geissberger, Fabienne-Desirée; Huder, Jon B; Böni, Jürg; Benden, Christian; Mueller, Nicolas J; Trkola, Alexandra; Huber, Michael (2015). Unbiased metagenomic sequencing complements specific routine diagnostic methods and increases chances to detect rare viral strains. Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, 83(2):133-138.

Abstract

Multiplex PCR assays for respiratory viruses are widely used in routine diagnostics, as they are highly sensitive, rapid, and cost effective. However, depending on the assay system, cross-reactivity between viruses that share a high sequence homology as well as detection of rare virus isolates with sequence variations can be problematic. Virus sequence-independent metagenomic high-throughput sequencing allows for accurate detection of all virus species in a given sample, as we demonstrate here for human Enterovirus and Rhinovirus in a lung transplant patient. While early in infection a commercial PCR assay recorded Rhinovirus, high-throughput sequencing correctly identified human Enterovirus C104 as the source of infection, highlighting the potential of the technology and the benefit of applying open assay formats in complex diagnostic situations.

Abstract

Multiplex PCR assays for respiratory viruses are widely used in routine diagnostics, as they are highly sensitive, rapid, and cost effective. However, depending on the assay system, cross-reactivity between viruses that share a high sequence homology as well as detection of rare virus isolates with sequence variations can be problematic. Virus sequence-independent metagenomic high-throughput sequencing allows for accurate detection of all virus species in a given sample, as we demonstrate here for human Enterovirus and Rhinovirus in a lung transplant patient. While early in infection a commercial PCR assay recorded Rhinovirus, high-throughput sequencing correctly identified human Enterovirus C104 as the source of infection, highlighting the potential of the technology and the benefit of applying open assay formats in complex diagnostic situations.

Statistics

Citations

3 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:October 2015
Deposited On:20 Nov 2015 13:16
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0732-8893
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.diagmicrobio.2015.06.017
PubMed ID:26231254

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations