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The swiss transplant cohort study: lessons from the first 6 years


Berger, Christoph; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Boggian, Katja; Cusini, Alexia; Egli, Adrian; Garzoni, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H; Hoffmann, Matthias; Khanna, Nina; Manuel, Oriol; Meylan, Pascal; Nadal, David; van Delden, Christian; Weisser, Maja; Mueller, Nicolas J (2015). The swiss transplant cohort study: lessons from the first 6 years. Current Infectious Disease Reports, 17(6):17:29.

Abstract

Prospective cohort studies significantly contribute to answering specific research questions in a defined population. Since 2008, the Swiss Transplant Cohort Study (STCS) systematically enrolled >95 % of all transplant recipients in Switzerland, collecting predefined data at determined time points. Designed as an open cohort, the STCS has included >3900 patients to date, with a median follow-up of 2.96 years (IQR 1.44-4.73). This review highlights some relevant findings in the field of transplant-associated infections gained by the STCS so far. Three key general aspects have crystallized: (i) Well-run cohort studies are a powerful tool to conduct genetic studies, which are crucially dependent on a meticulously described phenotype. (ii) Long-term real-life observations are adding a distinct layer of information that cannot be obtained during randomized studies. (iii) The systemic collection of data, close interdisciplinary collaboration, and continuous analysis of some key outcome data such as infectious diseases endpoints can improve patient care.

Abstract

Prospective cohort studies significantly contribute to answering specific research questions in a defined population. Since 2008, the Swiss Transplant Cohort Study (STCS) systematically enrolled >95 % of all transplant recipients in Switzerland, collecting predefined data at determined time points. Designed as an open cohort, the STCS has included >3900 patients to date, with a median follow-up of 2.96 years (IQR 1.44-4.73). This review highlights some relevant findings in the field of transplant-associated infections gained by the STCS so far. Three key general aspects have crystallized: (i) Well-run cohort studies are a powerful tool to conduct genetic studies, which are crucially dependent on a meticulously described phenotype. (ii) Long-term real-life observations are adding a distinct layer of information that cannot be obtained during randomized studies. (iii) The systemic collection of data, close interdisciplinary collaboration, and continuous analysis of some key outcome data such as infectious diseases endpoints can improve patient care.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:June 2015
Deposited On:20 Nov 2015 13:30
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 14:53
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1523-3847
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11908-015-0486-5
PubMed ID:25916997

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