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Screw loosening and pelvic canal narrowing after lateral plating of feline ilial fractures with locking and nonlocking plates


Schmierer, Philipp A; Kircher, Patrick R; Hartnack, Sonja; Knell, Sebastian C (2015). Screw loosening and pelvic canal narrowing after lateral plating of feline ilial fractures with locking and nonlocking plates. Veterinary Surgery, 44(7):900-904.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare the frequency of complications, including screw loosening and pelvic canal narrowing, associated with dynamic compression plating, locking plating, and double locking plating of ilial fractures in cats.
STUDY DESIGN: Historical cohort study.
METHODS: The radiographs and medical records of cats with pelvic fractures that were presented between 2004 and 2013 were reviewed. The cases were categorized based on the plate type and number as dynamic compression plate (DCP), single locking plate (LPS) and double locking plates (dLPS). The frequency of screw loosening was compared across categories using a Fisher's exact test. The change in pelvic alignment, described by the change in sacral index (postoperative sacral index-followup sacral index), was compared across plate categories using ANOVA.
RESULTS: The frequency of screw loosening for DCP (5/10) was significantly higher than LPS (1/13) and dLPS (0/11) (P = .05, P = .012, respectively). There was no significant difference in the SI change across plate categories. The mean change in sacral index for DCP was -0.11 (95%CI -0.25 to 0.03), for LPS was 0.0007 (95%CI -0.07 to 0.08), and for dLPS was -0.01 (95%CI -0.04 to 0.02). None of the cats showed constipation postoperatively.
CONCLUSION: Screw loosening occurred less often but the change in pelvic canal alignment was not significantly different in ilial fractures repaired with LPS or dLPS compared to ilial fractures repaired with DCP. Locking plating of ilial fractures in cats may offer advantages compared to nonlocking plating.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To compare the frequency of complications, including screw loosening and pelvic canal narrowing, associated with dynamic compression plating, locking plating, and double locking plating of ilial fractures in cats.
STUDY DESIGN: Historical cohort study.
METHODS: The radiographs and medical records of cats with pelvic fractures that were presented between 2004 and 2013 were reviewed. The cases were categorized based on the plate type and number as dynamic compression plate (DCP), single locking plate (LPS) and double locking plates (dLPS). The frequency of screw loosening was compared across categories using a Fisher's exact test. The change in pelvic alignment, described by the change in sacral index (postoperative sacral index-followup sacral index), was compared across plate categories using ANOVA.
RESULTS: The frequency of screw loosening for DCP (5/10) was significantly higher than LPS (1/13) and dLPS (0/11) (P = .05, P = .012, respectively). There was no significant difference in the SI change across plate categories. The mean change in sacral index for DCP was -0.11 (95%CI -0.25 to 0.03), for LPS was 0.0007 (95%CI -0.07 to 0.08), and for dLPS was -0.01 (95%CI -0.04 to 0.02). None of the cats showed constipation postoperatively.
CONCLUSION: Screw loosening occurred less often but the change in pelvic canal alignment was not significantly different in ilial fractures repaired with LPS or dLPS compared to ilial fractures repaired with DCP. Locking plating of ilial fractures in cats may offer advantages compared to nonlocking plating.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2015
Deposited On:17 Nov 2015 10:29
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 14:54
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0161-3499
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/vsu.12367
PubMed ID:26256446

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