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Spinal pain-good sleep matters: a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial


Paanalahti, Kari; Wertli, Maria M; Held, Ulrike; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Holm, Lena W; Nordin, Margareta; Skillgate, Eva (2016). Spinal pain-good sleep matters: a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. European Spine Journal, 25(3):760-765.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The estimated prevalence of poor sleep in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain is estimated to 64 % in the adult population. The annual cost for musculoskeletal pain and reported poor sleep is estimated to be billions of dollars annually in the US. The aim of this cohort study with one-year follow-up was to explore the role of impaired sleep with daytime consequence on the prognosis of non-specific neck and/or back pain.
METHODS: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial, including 409 patients.
RESULTS: Patients with good sleep at baseline were more likely to experience a minimal clinically important difference in pain [OR 2.03 (95 % CI 1.22-3.38)] and disability [OR 1.85 (95 % CI 1.04-3.30)] compared to patients with impaired sleep at one-year follow-up.
CONCLUSION: Patients with non-specific neck and/or back pain and self-reported good sleep are more likely to experience a minimal clinically important difference in pain and disability compared to patients with impaired sleep with daytime consequence.

Abstract

PURPOSE: The estimated prevalence of poor sleep in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain is estimated to 64 % in the adult population. The annual cost for musculoskeletal pain and reported poor sleep is estimated to be billions of dollars annually in the US. The aim of this cohort study with one-year follow-up was to explore the role of impaired sleep with daytime consequence on the prognosis of non-specific neck and/or back pain.
METHODS: Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial, including 409 patients.
RESULTS: Patients with good sleep at baseline were more likely to experience a minimal clinically important difference in pain [OR 2.03 (95 % CI 1.22-3.38)] and disability [OR 1.85 (95 % CI 1.04-3.30)] compared to patients with impaired sleep at one-year follow-up.
CONCLUSION: Patients with non-specific neck and/or back pain and self-reported good sleep are more likely to experience a minimal clinically important difference in pain and disability compared to patients with impaired sleep with daytime consequence.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2016
Deposited On:23 Nov 2015 11:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:32
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0940-6719
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00586-015-3987-x
PubMed ID:26063054

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