Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Could less be more when assessing patient-rated outcome in spinal stenosis?


Mannion, Anne F; Fekete, Tamas F; Wertli, Maria M; Mattle, Michele; Nauer, Selina; Kleinstück, Frank S; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Haschtmann, Daniel; Becker, Hans-Jürgen; Porchet, François (2015). Could less be more when assessing patient-rated outcome in spinal stenosis? Spine, 40(10):710-718.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal study of the measurement properties of a brief outcome instrument.
OBJECTIVE: In patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis, we compared the responsiveness of the Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) with that of the condition-specific Swiss Spinal Stenosis Measure (SSM), an instrument developed to assess patients with neurogenic claudication.
SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The COMI is a validated multidimensional questionnaire for assessing the key outcomes of importance to patients with back problems. Being brief, it is associated with minimal respondent burden and high completion rates. However, for a given pathology, intuitively it may be expected to be less responsive than a condition-specific instrument.
METHODS: A total of 91 patients (73±8 yr; 53% males) completed the following questionnaires before surgery: COMI, SSM, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, back trouble "Feeling Thermometer," pain numeric rating scale, EuroQoL-visual analogue scale. Twelve months postoperatively, 78/91 (86%) completed all the questionnaires again; they also rated the "global treatment outcome" (GTO; rated 1-5) and SSM "satisfaction with treatment result" (SSM-sat; rated 1-4), which were used as external criteria of treatment success.
RESULTS: Scores for the external criteria of success (GTO/SSM-sat) correlated with the change scores (baseline to 12 mo) in COMI (r=0.57) and SSM (r=0.54) to a similar extent. Using receiver operating characteristics, with GTO or SSM-sat dichotomized as external criterion, the area under the curve was similar for the COMI change score (0.86-0.90) and the SSM (sub)scales (0.80-0.90).
CONCLUSION: With either SSM-sat or GTO serving as the external criterion, COMI was as responsive as the SSM. The COMI is well able to detect important change in lumbar spinal stenosis and has the added benefit of reducing the response burden for the patient and facilitating outcome comparisons with other spinal pathologies.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: Longitudinal study of the measurement properties of a brief outcome instrument.
OBJECTIVE: In patients undergoing surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis, we compared the responsiveness of the Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) with that of the condition-specific Swiss Spinal Stenosis Measure (SSM), an instrument developed to assess patients with neurogenic claudication.
SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The COMI is a validated multidimensional questionnaire for assessing the key outcomes of importance to patients with back problems. Being brief, it is associated with minimal respondent burden and high completion rates. However, for a given pathology, intuitively it may be expected to be less responsive than a condition-specific instrument.
METHODS: A total of 91 patients (73±8 yr; 53% males) completed the following questionnaires before surgery: COMI, SSM, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, back trouble "Feeling Thermometer," pain numeric rating scale, EuroQoL-visual analogue scale. Twelve months postoperatively, 78/91 (86%) completed all the questionnaires again; they also rated the "global treatment outcome" (GTO; rated 1-5) and SSM "satisfaction with treatment result" (SSM-sat; rated 1-4), which were used as external criteria of treatment success.
RESULTS: Scores for the external criteria of success (GTO/SSM-sat) correlated with the change scores (baseline to 12 mo) in COMI (r=0.57) and SSM (r=0.54) to a similar extent. Using receiver operating characteristics, with GTO or SSM-sat dichotomized as external criterion, the area under the curve was similar for the COMI change score (0.86-0.90) and the SSM (sub)scales (0.80-0.90).
CONCLUSION: With either SSM-sat or GTO serving as the external criterion, COMI was as responsive as the SSM. The COMI is well able to detect important change in lumbar spinal stenosis and has the added benefit of reducing the response burden for the patient and facilitating outcome comparisons with other spinal pathologies.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2.

Statistics

Citations

4 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

24 downloads since deposited on 17 Nov 2015
17 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Geriatric Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:spinal stenosis, outcome, Swiss Spinal Stenosis Measure (SSM), Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI), responsiveness, validity, receiver operating
Language:English
Date:15 May 2015
Deposited On:17 Nov 2015 10:13
Last Modified:16 May 2016 00:00
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0362-2436
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0000000000000751
PubMed ID:25955088

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Preview
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 766kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations