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Comprehensive assessment of walking function after human spinal cord injury


Awai, Lea; Curt, Armin (2015). Comprehensive assessment of walking function after human spinal cord injury. Progress in Brain Research, 218:1-14.

Abstract

Regaining any locomotor function after spinal cord injury is not only of immediate importance for affected patients but also for clinical research as it allows to investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment and locomotor recovery. Clinical scores inform on functional outcomes that are clinically meaningful to value effects of therapy while they all lack the ability to explain underlying mechanisms of recovery. For this purpose, more elaborate recordings of walking kinematics combined with assessments of spinal cord conductivity and muscle activation patterns are required. A comprehensive assessment framework comprising of multiple complementary modalities is necessary. This will not only allow for capturing even subtle changes induced by interventions that are likely missed by standard clinical outcome measures. It will be fundamental to attribute observed changes to naturally occurring spontaneous recovery in contrast to specific changes induced by novel therapeutic interventions beyond the improvements achieved by conventional therapy.

Abstract

Regaining any locomotor function after spinal cord injury is not only of immediate importance for affected patients but also for clinical research as it allows to investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment and locomotor recovery. Clinical scores inform on functional outcomes that are clinically meaningful to value effects of therapy while they all lack the ability to explain underlying mechanisms of recovery. For this purpose, more elaborate recordings of walking kinematics combined with assessments of spinal cord conductivity and muscle activation patterns are required. A comprehensive assessment framework comprising of multiple complementary modalities is necessary. This will not only allow for capturing even subtle changes induced by interventions that are likely missed by standard clinical outcome measures. It will be fundamental to attribute observed changes to naturally occurring spontaneous recovery in contrast to specific changes induced by novel therapeutic interventions beyond the improvements achieved by conventional therapy.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:29 March 2015
Deposited On:23 Nov 2015 14:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0079-6123
Additional Information:Sensorimotor Rehabilitation — At the Crossroads of Basic and Clinical Sciences
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pbr.2014.12.004
PubMed ID:25890130

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