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Factors associated with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci as causing organisms in deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery


Sommerstein, R; Kohler, P; Wilhelm, M J; Kuster, S P; Sax, H (2015). Factors associated with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci as causing organisms in deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery. New Microbes and New Infections, 6:15-21.

Abstract

Established preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is ineffective against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This case-control study aimed to determine factors predicting deep sternal wound infections due to methicillin-resistant CoNS. All cardiac surgery patients undergoing sternotomy between June 2009 and March 2013 prospectively documented in a Swiss tertiary care center were included. Among 1999 patients, 82 (4.1%) developed deep sternal wound infection. CoNS were causal in 36 (44%) patients, with 25/36 (69%) being methicillin resistant. Early reintervention for noninfectious causes (odds ratio (OR) 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-9.5) was associated with methicillin-resistant CoNS deep sternal wound infection. Among CoNS deep sternal wound infection, perioperative antimicrobial therapy (p 0.002), early reintervention for noninfectious causes (OR 7.9; 95% CI 0.9-71.1) and time between surgery and diagnosis of infection over 21 days (OR 10.8; 95% CI 1.2-97.8) were associated with methicillin resistance. These findings may help to better tailor preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis.

Abstract

Established preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is ineffective against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This case-control study aimed to determine factors predicting deep sternal wound infections due to methicillin-resistant CoNS. All cardiac surgery patients undergoing sternotomy between June 2009 and March 2013 prospectively documented in a Swiss tertiary care center were included. Among 1999 patients, 82 (4.1%) developed deep sternal wound infection. CoNS were causal in 36 (44%) patients, with 25/36 (69%) being methicillin resistant. Early reintervention for noninfectious causes (odds ratio (OR) 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-9.5) was associated with methicillin-resistant CoNS deep sternal wound infection. Among CoNS deep sternal wound infection, perioperative antimicrobial therapy (p 0.002), early reintervention for noninfectious causes (OR 7.9; 95% CI 0.9-71.1) and time between surgery and diagnosis of infection over 21 days (OR 10.8; 95% CI 1.2-97.8) were associated with methicillin resistance. These findings may help to better tailor preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:July 2015
Deposited On:25 Nov 2015 09:20
Last Modified:21 Aug 2017 01:10
Publisher:Elsevier Ltd
ISSN:2052-2975
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nmni.2015.04.003
PubMed ID:26042188

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