Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Tibial nerve stimulation for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: a systematic review - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Schneider, Marc P; Gross, Tobias; Bachmann, Lucas M; et al (2015). Tibial nerve stimulation for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: a systematic review. European Urology, 68(5):859-867.

Abstract

CONTEXT: Tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) is a promising therapy for non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and might also be a valuable option for patients with an underlying neurological disorder.
OBJECTIVE: We systematically reviewed all available evidence on the efficacy and safety of TNS for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD).
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: After screening 1943 articles, 16 studies (4 randomized controlled trials [RCTs], 9 prospective cohort studies, 2 retrospective case series, and 1 case report) enrolling 469 patients (283 women and 186 men) were included. Five studies reported on acute TNS and 11 on chronic TNS. In acute and chronic TNS, the mean increase of maximum cystometric capacity ranged from 56 to 132mL and from 49 to 150mL, and the mean increase of bladder volume at first detrusor overactivity ranged from 44 to 92mL and from 93 to 121mL, respectively. In acute and chronic TNS, the mean decrease of maximum detrusor pressure during the storage phase ranged from 5 to 15cm H2O and from 4 to 21cm H2O, respectively. In chronic TNS, the mean decrease in number of voids per 24h, in number of leakages per 24h, and in postvoid residual ranged from 3 to 7, from 1 to 4, and from 15 to 55mL, respectively. No TNS-related adverse events have been reported. Risk of bias and confounding was high in most studies.
CONCLUSIONS: Although preliminary data of RCTs and non-RCTs suggest TNS might be effective and safe for treating NLUTD, the evidence base is poor, derived from small, mostly noncomparative studies with a high risk of bias and confounding. More reliable data from well-designed RCTs are needed to reach definitive conclusions.
PATIENT SUMMARY: Early data suggest tibial nerve stimulation might be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, but more reliable evidence is required.

Abstract

CONTEXT: Tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) is a promising therapy for non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and might also be a valuable option for patients with an underlying neurological disorder.
OBJECTIVE: We systematically reviewed all available evidence on the efficacy and safety of TNS for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD).
EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement.
EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: After screening 1943 articles, 16 studies (4 randomized controlled trials [RCTs], 9 prospective cohort studies, 2 retrospective case series, and 1 case report) enrolling 469 patients (283 women and 186 men) were included. Five studies reported on acute TNS and 11 on chronic TNS. In acute and chronic TNS, the mean increase of maximum cystometric capacity ranged from 56 to 132mL and from 49 to 150mL, and the mean increase of bladder volume at first detrusor overactivity ranged from 44 to 92mL and from 93 to 121mL, respectively. In acute and chronic TNS, the mean decrease of maximum detrusor pressure during the storage phase ranged from 5 to 15cm H2O and from 4 to 21cm H2O, respectively. In chronic TNS, the mean decrease in number of voids per 24h, in number of leakages per 24h, and in postvoid residual ranged from 3 to 7, from 1 to 4, and from 15 to 55mL, respectively. No TNS-related adverse events have been reported. Risk of bias and confounding was high in most studies.
CONCLUSIONS: Although preliminary data of RCTs and non-RCTs suggest TNS might be effective and safe for treating NLUTD, the evidence base is poor, derived from small, mostly noncomparative studies with a high risk of bias and confounding. More reliable data from well-designed RCTs are needed to reach definitive conclusions.
PATIENT SUMMARY: Early data suggest tibial nerve stimulation might be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, but more reliable evidence is required.

Citations

5 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:17 July 2015
Deposited On:23 Nov 2015 13:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 19:32
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0302-2838
Additional Information:Review – Neuro-urology
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eururo.2015.07.001
PubMed ID:26194043

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations